WASHINGTON — Back then, people called him Danny. The year was 1959 and Daniel Inouye was a rookie senator in Hawaii’s Territorial Legislature.

With his sights set on an open seat in the U.S. House that was newly created for the 50th state, 34-year-old Inouye drew up a list of “campaign instructions” to get him there.

It appears they worked.

More than one dozen successful campaigns later, Inouye is a political legend in Hawaii and one of the most influential senators in Washington.

Take note, political hopefuls, of the instructions he outlined in 1959.

Conduct a Clean, Constructive Campaign

a. Never “chop” the opposing candidates.

b. Never conduct a negative campaign by being unreasonably critical of the opposing candidates.

c. Never begin or pass on false rumors about the opposing candidates.

d. Never conduct a destructive, dirty campaign. REMEMBER our opponents are worthy candidates

e. Be positive. Sell your candidate… on the basis of qualifications, legislative experience, community service, ability and character.

f. Treat the supporters of the opposing candidates with courtesy and consideration.

REMEMBER: IT IS BETTER TO LOSE A CLEAN CAMPAIGN THAN TO WIN A DIRTY ONE.

Success achieved through slander, slurs and slime is success unworthy of your candidate.

Civil Beat happened upon the campaign literature in one of hundreds of containers from former Congresswoman Patsy Mink‘s collection at the Library of Congress. Inouye handily defeated Mink in the 1959 Democratic primary, the campaign for which he issued the instructions.

Here’s a look at the original document:

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