The results are in and — gee, what a shock! — Hawaii Democrats love Barack Obama.

Didn’t we already know that?

The Democratic Party of Hawaii held a Democratic Presidential Preference Poll during precinct meetings at 51 locations across the state on Wednesday.

The results, finalized late Thursday:

Votes cast: 1,358

For Obama: 1,316

Uncommitted: 42

Party officials felt it was important to hold a presidential preference poll, even though the outcome seemed obvious.

“It is important that we strongly voice our support for President Obama and that Democrats cast their votes for the local leadership of our Party,” party chair Dante Carpenter said in a press release.

Maybe local Democrats are nervous in advance of the Hawaii Republican Party’s first-ever presidential caucus March 13.

Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich and Ron Paul each shelled out the $5,000 to qualify for the ballot.

With GOP primaries that same day in Mississippi and Alabama, Hawaii’s caucus could get some national press despite the time zone challenge.

Paul has already run a commercial here, and he, Romney and Santorum are expected to send surrogates to Hawaii to drum up support.

Gingrich has visited the islands several times recently, while Santorum could benefit from the support of groups like the Hawaii Christian Coalition, which is backing his campaign. Romney could be helped by the sizable Mormon population here.

It’s highly unlikely Hawaii will vote for a Republican candidate in the president’s birth state. A Civil Beat poll in October found 63 percent of likely voters in Hawaii approve of Obama’s job performance as president, while just 33 percent disapprove.

Local Democrats weren’t just giving their preference for president Wednesday night. They also conducted precinct elections to select delegates to the state Democratic Convention to be held in May, and to select district chairs.

But it seems silly to hold a presidential preference poll with only one candidate — a favorite son, at that — to choose from.

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