Civil Beat Reporting Fellow

Courtney Teague

Courtney Teague is a reporting fellow for Civil Beat.

She graduated from the University of Hawaii at Manoa with degrees in English and philosophy. Though Courtney’s phobia of weather below 70 degrees brought her to Oahu from Southern California in 2013, she’s come to love the island’s beaches, cuisine and culture.

When she began at Civil Beat as an intern in January 2016, Courtney continued to write about university matters such as its notorious struggle with deferred maintenance costs and energy use. Courtney has also covered education, infrastructure, and public policy at city and state levels. As news editor for campus paper Ka Leo O Hawaii, she led a staff of reporters, followed key UH issues and contributed to the editorial board.

Courtney covers a wide range of local news, focusing on state government, education and women’s issues. To contact her, email courtney@civilbeat.org, or follow her on Facebook and Twitter.

Hawaii Seems Poised To Ban Coral-Damaging Sunscreen Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Seems Poised To Ban Coral-Damaging Sunscreen

It would be the first state to prohibit the use of sunscreen containing ingredients that scientists say harm sea life.

Hawaii Lawmakers May Expand Definition Of Drugged Driving Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Lawmakers May Expand Definition Of Drugged Driving

A measure to ensure that driving under the influence of marijuana remains illegal also addresses other substances.

Tactics To Revive Mauna Kea Bill Leave Even Senators Confused Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Tactics To Revive Mauna Kea Bill Leave Even Senators Confused

Recesses in a public floor session to talk privately about the legislative maneuvering slow down “second crossover” day at the Hawaii Capitol.

Edibles Could Be Coming Soon To Medical Marijuana Dispensaries Flickr: Larry

Edibles Could Be Coming Soon To Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

Key Hawaii legislators in both chambers also support workplace protections for employees who consume medical cannabis.

Senate Waters Down Bill To Set Minimum Police Officer Standards Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Senate Waters Down Bill To Set Minimum Police Officer Standards

UPDATED: Every state except Hawaii already does so, but a measure that passed the House has been gutted in the Senate.

Hawaii’s Medical Pot Program Struggling To Get Its Act Together Anthony Quintano / Civil Beat

Hawaii’s Medical Pot Program Struggling To Get Its Act Together

The licensing and inspection programs remain very short-staffed, but pot shop owners are pleased by the state’s recruitment efforts.

Legislators Again Consider Making More Police Disciplinary Records Public Civil Beat

Legislators Again Consider Making More Police Disciplinary Records Public

For the fifth straight year, there’s a bill to end the exemption for officers to a public records law that applies to everyone else.

Bill Would Set 6-Year Term For Office Of Information Practices Chief Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Bill Would Set 6-Year Term For Office Of Information Practices Chief

The measure would increase the job security of the director charged with ensuring adherence to Hawaii’s open government laws.

Feds Say UH Manoa Overcharged Disabled Dorm Residents Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Feds Say UH Manoa Overcharged Disabled Dorm Residents

The university has refunded about $100,000 to more than 40 students to resolve a federal complaint.

Hawaii Students Join Walkouts In Wake Of School Shootings Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Students Join Walkouts In Wake Of School Shootings

On campuses across the islands, youths gather to honor the victims of the Florida massacre and call for action on gun control.

Lawmakers Want To Preserve Obamacare — At Least In Hawaii Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Lawmakers Want To Preserve Obamacare — At Least In Hawaii

Several bills in the Legislature would protect or resurrect aspects of the federal Affordable Care Act.

Government Transparency An Early Loser In Legislative Session Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Government Transparency An Early Loser In Legislative Session

Open government bills have mostly died, and some measures restricting information are still alive.