Eric Pape

Eric Pape began his journalism career in 1993 in Cochabamba, Bolivia, where he evolved from a drug policy analyst into a journalist writing on the U.S. drug war in Latin America — at least when he wasn’t playing “rainforest basketball” alongside coca leaf growers.

He’s since worked as a journalist on five continents — largely for Newsweek and The Daily Beast, but also for the Los Angeles Times and Foreign Policy.

Eric has authored long-form narrative articles for the Los Angeles Times Sunday magazine on exiles, ethnic communities in American cities, and the impact of 9/11 on New York City. He has interviewed world-city mayors, heads of state, a former dictator or two, accused war criminals and a convicted terrorist on his release from prison for his involvement in an assassination in Washington, D.C. While living in Manhattan, Eric wrote on extremism, terrorism and the evolution of the city’s ethnic diversity.

He has contributed to The New York Times, The Guardian, The Independent on Sunday, the LA Weekly, Los Angeles magazine, Mother Jones, Salon, Slate, and Vibe magazine. His writings on Sierra Leone and the Democratic Republic of Congo for Spin magazine earned a special mention and inclusion in the annual “Best Music Writing” journalism anthologies.

His formative journalism experiences came in Southeast Asia, where he focused on investigative reporting on the end of Cambodia’s Khmer Rouge movement, particularly brutal human rights abuses, and a violent political power struggle.

Newsweek magazine hired Eric to work out of its Paris bureau in 2003 as a special correspondent on Europe and northern Africa. He interviewed top politicians, artists and intellectuals, and reported on the ground in Madrid on the terrorist train bombings of 2004, from the streets of Parisian ghettos during fiery riots that rocked France in 2005, and on the 2006 war between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon.

Eric has often appeared as a commentator/analyst on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, Al-Jazeera, the BBC, and dozens of other broadcasters in the US, Europe, Asia and Latin America. He speaks Spanish and French, and is a co-author of Shake Girl, a graphic novel that was based on one of his articles.

He was a 2008 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford University. Previously, he earned a BA in Literature and Creative Writing from the University of California at Santa Cruz, and an MA in International Journalism from City University in London. Eric grew up on the west side of Los Angeles, mostly in Venice Beach and Santa Monica.

Here in Hawaii, he is particularly interested in the global diversity on these islands, not to mention their elaborate links to the world beyond these shores.

He is available to chat about these and other things, and he’s especially eager to hear about the best pick-up basketball game in town. Reach him at eric@civilbeat.com and follow him on Twitter at @ericpape.

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What’s Next For The Company That Shaped Hawaii History?

The president of Hawaiian Electric Co. discusses how the utility plans to get Hawaii to a 100 percent renewable energy future and the difficulties it faces.
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Seventy years ago, Hawaiian Electric Co. envisioned the future. Here's what it looked like.
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How The Quest For Clean Energy Sank HECO’s Biggest Deal Ever

Hawaii political leaders and regulators didn't think selling Hawaiian Electric to a mainland company would help get the utility off oil.
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Why It Took A Republican Governor To Get Blue Hawaii On The Path To Clean Energy

When Gov. Linda Lingle pushed for sweeping renewable energy legislation, Hawaiian Electric pushed back. But Lingle eventually won.
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Big Risks Led To Big Losses For Hawaiian Electric

Hawaiian Electric leaders tried to turn an electric utility into an investment powerhouse. It didn't quite stick.
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How A Mideast War Made HECO Start To Think Green

The Arab oil crisis brought a new awareness of the promise of renewable energy. But the spark fizzled. Hawaiian Electric was hooked on oil.
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Hawaiian Electric Shares Take A Dive After Merger Rejection

The end of NextEra Energy's bid to take over the electric company that powers 95 percent of island residents triggered big losses for shareholders.
What Happened When HECO Went To Wall Street Courtesy of the Hawaiian Electric Co. - All Rights Reserved

What Happened When HECO Went To Wall Street

Energized by statehood and a booming economy, Hawaiian Electric began to reach beyond Oahu for investors and investments.
Why Everyone Wanted To Work For Hawaiian Electric Wikimedia Commons

Why Everyone Wanted To Work For Hawaiian Electric

With a devastating war behind it, Hawaii embraced the promise of a bright future. And it needed HECO more than ever.
How HECO Helped Pull Hawaii Through The Tough Times Courtesy of Hawaiian Electric

How HECO Helped Pull Hawaii Through The Tough Times

Hawaiian Electric played a key role in Hawaii's economic recovery from the Great Depression. And then World War II hit the islands.
Learning To Live In The Electric Century Courtesy of Hawaiian Electric Co.

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Hawaiian Electric Co. saw its profits skyrocket as people began using newfangled electric appliances.
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Friends In High Places Helped HECO Tighten Its Grip On Hawaii

The federal government's takeover of Hawaii proved extremely fortuitous for Hawaiian Electric. So was the involvement of leading local families.