Civil Beat Staff

Suevon Lee

Suevon Lee joined Honolulu Civil Beat as a reporter in June 2017.

She was previously based in Los Angeles, where she wrote for legal news wire Law360. She also served as editor-in-chief of former print culture magazine, KoreAm Journal.

She has also worked in New York, where she was a reporting intern for ProPublica and editor/reporter for an affiliate publication of the New York Law Journal. She has also spent time in Florida, covering courts for the Ocala Star-Banner.

Originally from the D.C. suburbs, Suevon graduated from the University of Maryland with a degree in English. She holds a masters from Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism and a master of studies in law from Yale Law School.

You can reach Suevon at slee@civilbeat.org and follow her on Twitter @suevlee.

Charter School Debuts An Online Hawaiian-English Dictionary Suevon Lee/Civil Beat

Charter School Debuts An Online Hawaiian-English Dictionary

Students at the immersion school say the product could prepare them for a vocabulary test. But it’s also designed for the wider community.

Board Of Education Seeks Public Money For Charter School Facilities Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Board Of Education Seeks Public Money For Charter School Facilities

Despite “mixed” reviews of their performance last year, the charters deserve more taxpayer money, the board says.

UH Graduate Students Say GOP Tax Plan Could Derail Their Education Cory Lum/Civil Beat

UH Graduate Students Say GOP Tax Plan Could Derail Their Education

Many are already financially strapped, and one Republican proposal would increase their tax liability by thousands of dollars.

How ‘Zombie Maze’  Is Teaching Hawaii Kids Computer Science Cory Lum/Civil Beat

How ‘Zombie Maze’ Is Teaching Hawaii Kids Computer Science

Some schools are making headway in the subject, but huge challenges remain. Better-paying jobs are at stake.

Hawaii Has Fewer Certified Teachers This Year Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Has Fewer Certified Teachers This Year

Board of Education members want state officials to rethink how they plan to recruit and retain new teachers in the long run.

UH Manoa’s College of Education Names New Dean Civil Beat file photo

UH Manoa’s College of Education Names New Dean

Nathan Murata beat out two other finalists for the job of leading the College of Education.

Disabled Job Seekers Left In Limbo By Agency’s Cash Crunch Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Disabled Job Seekers Left In Limbo By Agency’s Cash Crunch

Hawaii’s vocational rehabilitation program insists the problem is temporary, but some clients fear they’ll lose their support.

Missing School Has Become A Huge Problem in Hawaii

Missing School Has Become A Huge Problem in Hawaii

A Waianae school, where 40 percent of students are chronically absent, is trying home visits and a partnership with family court to keep kids in class.

Will Regular Classrooms Better Serve Hawaii’s Special Ed Students? Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Will Regular Classrooms Better Serve Hawaii’s Special Ed Students?

Co-teaching — classrooms with both a general and special-ed teacher — is catching on in a state that has one of the lowest “inclusion” rates in the nation.

Can School Gardens Get Kids To Eat Their Vegetables? Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Can School Gardens Get Kids To Eat Their Vegetables?

More than 80 percent of Hawaii schools have some kind of garden, part of a booming, nationwide farm-to-school movement.

OHA Money Will Go Directly To Hawaiian Charter Schools Cory Lum/Civil Beat

OHA Money Will Go Directly To Hawaiian Charter Schools

The Office of Hawaiian Affairs’ board vote reversed an earlier decision to use a third party to distribute the funds.

Educators: Pidgin Belongs In Hawaii Schools Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Educators: Pidgin Belongs In Hawaii Schools

The language that emerged from Hawaii’s blending of cultures “is something we have to embrace,” says a high school principal.