Civil Beat Staff

Stewart Yerton

Stewart Yerton reports on business and the economy for Honolulu Civil Beat. Those are subjects he spent more than a decade reporting on — at publications in New York, New Orleans and Honolulu.

He’s written about the U.S. treasury bond market, the business of big law firms, controversies surrounding the world’s largest gold mine on the island of New Guinea and corruption in the Louisiana casino industry. His reporting on the human cadaver trade, published in The Times-Picayune newspaper, won the Society of American Business Editors & Writers 2005 Best in Business Award for Enterprise Reporting in the large newspaper category.

Stewart’s first big newspaper story, for The Birmingham (Ala.) News, was about a political battle between a small-town mayor and the volunteer firefighters who were trying to oust him from office because of the mayor’s 30-year-old conviction for making moonshine whiskey. The story briefly thrust the tiny town of Brookside, Ala., into the national spotlight when The Washington Post came to write about the comic-gothic brouhaha.

A member of the Hawaii State Bar Association since January 2012, Stewart graduated cum laude from University of Hawaii’s William S. Richardson School of Law, where he earned the environmental law certificate. His paper “Procedural Standing and the Hawaii Superferry Decision: How a Surfer, a Paddler, and an Orchid Farmer Aligned Hawaii’s Standing Doctrine with Federal Principles” was published in the Asian Pacific Law & Policy Journal in 2011. In law school, Stewart externed for U.S. District Court Judge David Alan Ezra and served as the law school’s first Jarman Environmental Law Fellow. Stewart also has worked as an analyst with the Hawaii State Auditor’s office.

When not working, Stewart can often be found practicing yoga and Argentine tango, attempting to play guitar, and chauffeuring his two daughters around Oahu.

How A Princess’s Embattled Fortune Could Become A Massive Native Hawaiian Charity Cory Lum/Civil Beat

How A Princess’s Embattled Fortune Could Become A Massive Native Hawaiian Charity

Four other trusts, derived from the wealth of Native Hawaiian royalty, support a wide range of philanthropies and hold vast business interests.

Hawaii Lawmakers Not Sold On Rail Tax Extension Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Hawaii Lawmakers Not Sold On Rail Tax Extension

Legislators attending a briefing Monday appeared more favorable to tapping hotel tax money to help pay for the $10 billion rail line.

Hawaii Utilities Regulators Are Worried About Rising Electric Rates Blue Planet Foundation

Hawaii Utilities Regulators Are Worried About Rising Electric Rates

Commissioners are pushing HECO to do more to keep prices in check and customers from leaving the system.

Dream Plan or Pipe Dream? Group Pushes Street-Level Rail For Honolulu Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat

Dream Plan or Pipe Dream? Group Pushes Street-Level Rail For Honolulu

Salvage the Rail proposes ditching the over-budget elevated railway plan in much of the city.

Insurance May Not Be Enough For Some Marco Polo Condo Owners Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Insurance May Not Be Enough For Some Marco Polo Condo Owners

After the deadly Honolulu high-rise fire, some banks say they are also offering help to meet mortgage payments.

Why Is A High-Tech Agency Building A Center For Cops And Rescue Workers? Hawaii Technology Development Corp./University of Hawaii Community Design Center

Why Is A High-Tech Agency Building A Center For Cops And Rescue Workers?

The project raises questions about whether the Hawaii Technology Development Corp. is stepping away from its mission and legislative mandate.

Cybersecurity Experts Exchange Tricks Of The Trade In Honolulu Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Cybersecurity Experts Exchange Tricks Of The Trade In Honolulu

Political motives are driving hackers these days along with more sophisticated financial scams.

Ohio Firm To Buy Hawaiian Telcom For $650 Million Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Ohio Firm To Buy Hawaiian Telcom For $650 Million

The company says the deal with Cincinnati Bell won’t lead to the layoff of any of the company’s 1,300 employees in Hawaii.

Here’s Who Might Get Stung Hardest By Any New Rail Taxes Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Here’s Who Might Get Stung Hardest By Any New Rail Taxes

Critics say one of the options to pay for the over-budget Honolulu rail project — extending the general excise tax — would unfairly burden the poor.

HECO’s $205 Million Grid Plan Aims For Two-Way Flow Of Solar Power Jon Callas/Flickr.com

HECO’s $205 Million Grid Plan Aims For Two-Way Flow Of Solar Power

Public comments are being taken through Aug. 9 on a rough draft of the utility’s scaled-back upgrade proposal.

Matson Reaches Union Deal And Avoids Strike Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Matson Reaches Union Deal And Avoids Strike

UPDATED: A settlement averts a possible work stoppage for the company that ships 70 to 80 percent of the goods imported into Hawaii.

Special Permits Near Honolulu Rail Line Attract Proposals For Big Hotels Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Special Permits Near Honolulu Rail Line Attract Proposals For Big Hotels

Developers can build higher and denser as long as the city finds that their projects promote “transit-enhanced neighborhoods.”