Big Island

| Suggest an Edit

Updated May 2017

The “Big Island” of Hawaii is, as the nickname implies, the largest of the Hawaiian Islands. Hawaii island has 4,028 square miles of land and is more than five and a half times the size of the next largest island, Maui. Hawaii is the most eastern and southern island in the main chain and also the largest island in the Unites States.

 

Contents

The Basics

Hawaii island has two main population centers — Kona on the west coast and Hilo in the eastern part of the island. Hilo hosts the Merrie Monarch Festival, a weeklong celebration of Hawaiian culture and arts including a prestigious hula competition.

According to the U.S. Census and Hawaii State Data Center, the population of the Big Island is about 200,000, nearly 14 percent of the state’s total population.

Hawaii island is part of the state’s 2nd Congressional District and has been represented by Democratic Congresswoman Tulsi Gabbard since 2012.

Mauna Kea on Hawaii – a dormant volcano – is considered the tallest mountain in the world when measured from the seafloor to summit at over 33,000 feet.

Vog – volcanic smog – is a form of air pollution caused by a reaction between the gases from erupting volcanoes and oxygen, moisture and sunlight. One of Hawaii’s active volcanoes, Kilauea, saw its sulfur dioxide emissions increase when a new vent opened on March 12, 2008.

Economy

According to U.S. Census data released in 2010 (the most recent full census), Hawaii County had the lowest median income level in the county and the highest unemployment rate. About one-third of households were also receiving Social Security checks.

The most common jobs on the island were those in sales in office work, management and professional occupations, with over half of the island’s population finding work in these areas. Thirteen percent of residents worked in construction, extraction or maintenance and repair work. Finally, 6 percent were in production, transportation or material moving.

About 15 percent of Hawaii’s residents worked for the federal, state, or local government. About 10 percent were self-employed and the rest were in private industry.

The vast majority — about 90 percent — of people 25 years or older on the Big Island had at least graduated from high school. This rate was tied with Oahu for the highest percentage of high school graduates in the state. Just under one-third of residents had a bachelor’s degree or higher.

One of the major draws for tourists is Volcanoes National Park. Kiluea, a world-famous volcano, has been continuously spewing lava since 1983.

 Land

The Big Island is the largest island in the state of Hawaii. It has 4,028 miles of square land and is larger than all of the other major islands combined.

Hawaii was built from five separate volcanoes: Kohala (extinct), Mauna Kea (dormant), Hualalai (dormant), Mauna Loa (active) and Kilauea (active, continuously erupting since 1983). Due to the Mauna Loa and Kilauea eruptions, Hawaii is still a growing island.

Hawaii’s most prominent peak is Mauna Kea. When measured from the seafloor to its summit, it is the tallest mountain on Earth at over 33,000 feet. Measured above sea level, it reaches 13,803 feet.

History

The precise date of Polynesian settlers arriving in Hawaii is unknown but is estimated to be between 800-1000 AD. They came to Hawaii in double-hulled sailing canoes, using the stars to navigate, from the Marquesas to the Hawaiian Islands. Others are thought to have sailed from Samoa, Tahiti and possibly Tonga.

After the arrival of Captain James Cook in January of 1787, the islands would undergo an intense period of change.

Kamehameha, a young chief from Kohala, witnessed Cook’s death at Kealakekua Bay on the Big Island. He went on to unite all the islands after a long campaign of war beginning on Hawaii island and ending on Kauai.

Kamehameha became known as “Kamehameha the Great” for the accomplishment and established diplomatic ties with Westerners.

The Kingdom of Hawaii was officially established in 1810 under his rule. Kamehameha named the islands after his homeland of Hawaii island.

In 1893, a group of U.S. annexationists, led by Lorrin A. Thurston, fabricated a story that Americans were under attack in Hawaii. On Jan. 17 of that year, Marines from the USS Boston aided the annexationists in the successful overthrow of the monarchy.

Hawaii became a territory of the United States and in 1959 became a state.

Sugarcane, as with many of the other Hawaiian Islands, was the backbone of the Big Island’s economy beginning in the 19th century. However, by the middle of the 1950s, the industry began to downsize and would disappear entirely before 2000.

Today, the vast majority of Hawaii island’s economy is stimulated through tourism. Resorts and hotels lie primarily along the western coast of the island and provide thousands of jobs to local residents.

Big Island
Reader Rep: Was Civil Beat Right To Publish The Billy Kenoi Party Video? Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Reader Rep: Was Civil Beat Right To Publish The Billy Kenoi Party Video?

Addressing some key issues raised by readers about the publication of a video showing the Big Island mayor giving a profanity-laced toast.

Reader Rep: Billy Kenoi Should Blame Himself, Not The Media Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Reader Rep: Billy Kenoi Should Blame Himself, Not The Media

The Big Island mayor continues to try to blame "the media" for covering his misdeeds rather than take responsibility for what he did.
Profanity-Laced Video Shows Mayor Partying Hard At Conference Party Screenshot from video

Profanity-Laced Video Shows Mayor Partying Hard At Conference Party

The mayor of Hawaii County, who is accused of buying booze and other items with taxpayer money, appears to be heavily intoxicated.
State Investigating Placement Of Human Remains At TMT Site Cory Lum/Civil Beat

State Investigating Placement Of Human Remains At TMT Site

The Department of Land and Natural Resources acknowledged the probe in response to a public records request but won't say more
The Projector: Close Encounters With Molten Lava Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The Projector: Close Encounters With Molten Lava

Kilauea Volcano has been dumping lava into the ocean off the Big Island since late July. This week, I took a boat ride to watch new land being formed.
Harry Kim Wins Big Island Mayor Race Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Harry Kim Wins Big Island Mayor Race

Former managing director Wally Lau finished a distant second.
Does This Big Island Community Really Need 30,000 Solar Panels? Patricia Tummons

Does This Big Island Community Really Need 30,000 Solar Panels?

Residents of the Ocean View Ranchos subdivision are hoping state regulators reject an overhead power line, effectively killing the project.
$3.7M To Fight Diseases Cory Lum/Civil Beat

$3.7M To Fight Diseases

The federal funding aims to crack down on Hawaii's hepatitis A, Zika, dengue and sexually transmitted disease rates.
The Ghost In The Big Island’s Political Machine Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The Ghost In The Big Island’s Political Machine

Incumbent Billy Kenoi isn't among the 13 candidates for Hawaii County mayor, but his credit card scandal looms over the race.
Big Island’s New Marine Reserve Was A Long Time Coming Ana Giliberti-Ippel/Civil Beat

Big Island’s New Marine Reserve Was A Long Time Coming

The state's decision to establish a "no take zone" along a popular stretch of the island's west coast is hailed by some, derided by others.
Why The Big Island Is So Unhealthy Olja Latinovic/Flickr.com

Why The Big Island Is So Unhealthy

In a national study of health at the county level, Oahu ranks highest in the Aloha State and the Big Island lowest.
EPA Fines Hawaii’s Geothermal Plant Operator Ormat Technologies Inc.

EPA Fines Hawaii’s Geothermal Plant Operator

The operator of Hawaii's sole geothermal power plant is fined more than $76,000 for accidental chemical releases in 2013.