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Civil Beat

Civil Beat, an online news service launched by Peer News on May 4, 2010, provides people with a “civic square,” where citizens can learn about and understand, debate and discover the important issues facing Hawaii. The service focuses on a holistic approach to news, providing in-depth reporting on the issues that are most important to Hawaii.

Civil Beat aims to empower citizens to create positive change by connecting people to each other and informing them on key issues. The news service provides a forum for people to voice their opinions and share their knowledge in a civil environment that encourages conversation and dialogue – and enables them to learn from those with whom they might disagree.

At the core of Civil Beat are two main concepts:

Content: Civil Beat takes an investigative and analytical approach to journalism, focusing on topics and issues as opposed to event-based reporting.

Conversations: The service offers a place for civil interactions and idea sharing, where everyone can contribute to important dialogue. You can do this through Community Voices, which are columns and commentaries submitted by community members, as well as through the comments sections on stories.

In June 2016, Honolulu Civil Beat became a nonprofit news organization. We are counting on broad support from the community to help us continue to bring in-depth, independent journalism to Hawaii.

Reader Rep: The News Media’s Shifting World Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Reader Rep: The News Media’s Shifting World

Codes of ethics, questionable ads and audience sizes: Sometimes writing about just one topic a week doesn’t cut it.

Covering The Trump Administration, Civil Beat-Style Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Covering The Trump Administration, Civil Beat-Style

We think a new president in the White House along with a GOP-controlled Congress requires a strong journalistic presence in Washington, D.C.

Reader Rep: Watch What You Say Or Face The Obvious Consequences Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Reader Rep: Watch What You Say Or Face The Obvious Consequences

It’s not as if editors are standing by, waiting to police the comment string that follows news articles. We all should do our part to make this work.

Civil Beat’s Work Is Honored By Local Groups Tim Huynh/Civil Beat

Civil Beat’s Work Is Honored By Local Groups

Reporting on Chinatown and behavioral health issues recognized by a community organization and the Hawaii Psychological Association.

Civil Beat Draws On Local Talent To Bring Back Cartooning Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Civil Beat Draws On Local Talent To Bring Back Cartooning

Meet Waipahu native Caleb Hartsfield, a recent UH graduate who debuts today as our cartoonist.

Civil Beat’s Newest Intern Is Already Retired Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Civil Beat’s Newest Intern Is Already Retired

Our kupuna have a lot to offer Civil Beat's readers not to mention our reporters.
New Civil Beat Initiative: Meet 3 Aspiring Young Hawaii Journalists Cory Lum/Civil Beat

New Civil Beat Initiative: Meet 3 Aspiring Young Hawaii Journalists

We're helping local journalists develop important high-level skills in our new intensive internship program.
How to See More News On Facebook Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

How to See More News On Facebook

A recent change in the social media network's News Feed means people will see less content shared by news pages — but there's a way around it.
Ben Nishimoto Is Our New Director Of Philanthropy Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Ben Nishimoto Is Our New Director Of Philanthropy

Now that Civil Beat is a nonprofit we're beefing up our membership and donor-outreach staff.
Civil Beat Named Best Hawaii News Site For The 6th Year In A Row Patti Epler/Civil Beat

Civil Beat Named Best Hawaii News Site For The 6th Year In A Row

The Society of Professional Journalists also honored us with the top award of the contest, public service journalism, and in many other categories.
Civil Beat: Finding Our Place In Hawaii’s Media Landscape Wall To Wall Studios

Civil Beat: Finding Our Place In Hawaii’s Media Landscape

Our business model is changing. But our mission to help make Hawaii better is stronger than ever.