Honolulu City Council

| Suggest an Edit

The nine-member Honolulu City Council governs the City and County of Honolulu and is responsible for legislative and investigative functions. The mayor serves as chief executive of the city. All city council offices are nonpartisan and candidates are elected to four-year terms for a maximum of two consecutive terms.

Overview

The city has a mayor-council structure. The mayor serves as chief executive officer of the city, with responsibilities that include supervision of the executive agencies responsible for public safety and welfare; culture and recreation; community and human development; citizen participation; and general government operations.

A nine-member city council is responsible for legislative and investigative functions. All offices are nonpartisan and candidates are elected to four-year terms for a maximum of two consecutive terms. Elections are conducted by the city clerk every two years.

Because city elections are nonpartisan, the voters can choose from all candidates for each Honolulu office during the primary election. A candidate who receives more than 50 percent votes wins outright in the primary, otherwise the two candidates with the most votes advance to the general election.

In Honolulu, the adoption of a city charter that created a mayor-council government structure was the result of Hawaii’s statehood in 1959, when the Hawaii Legislature granted home rule to the counties. The last major structural change came from Mayor Harris in 1998, which services and operations were consolidated.

Salaries of elected and appointed officials are set by the Salary Commission for the City and County of Honolulu. Council members are paid $52,446 per year, with the chair getting $58,596.

Impacts

The City Council has a number of responsibilities to their constituents, such as supporting the community with safety, regulate transportation and the bus, homeowners like property taxes, homelessness, and the land such as waste, sanitation and water. The city is juggling a $10 billion Honolulu rail project and necessary road and sewage improvements. This election places much pressure on the incumbents to please its voters while also meeting its legal obligations of balancing the budget.

Because Honolulu is required by law to operate on a balanced budget, the approval process can be lengthy and rigorous. Each year, the mayor proposes a budget that the must approve, but the council is anything but a rubber stamp entity. Both sides have a tremendous amount of power in the affair.

It begins when the mayor submits a budget proposal to the city council before March 2. After public hearings, the City Council approves or revises the document. Only the mayor has the power to propose amendments to budget ordinances, as well as the ability to line item veto. But the council can override that veto. If the council doesn’t have enough votes to do so, the original budget automatically becomes law.

The mayor also can establish additional funds and move money within those funds, but approval from the City Council is required when dealing with cumulative expenditures over $100,000. The office of the city auditor monitors spending and reports to the City Council. The city operates on a fiscal year, so the enacted budget begins July 1.

Districts

The council is divided into nine districts:

District 1
Ewa, Ewa Beach, Honouliuli, West Loch, Kapolei, Kalaeloa (Barber’s Point), Honokai Hale and Nanakai Gardens, Ko Olina, Nanakuli, Waianae, Makaha, Keaau and Makua.

Kymberly Pine
phone: (808) 768-5001
kmpine@honolulu.gov

District 2
Mililani Mauka, Wahiawa, Whitmore Village, Mokuleia, Waialua, Haleiwa, Waimea, Pupukea, Sunset Beach, Kahuku, Laie, Hauula, Punaluu, Kahana, Kaaawa, Kualoa, Waiahole, Waikane, Kahaluu, Ahuimanu, and a portion of Heeia

Ernie Martin, who is also Council chair
phone: (808) 768-5002
emartin@honolulu.gov

District 3
Waimanalo, Kailua and most of Kaneohe

Ikaika Anderson
phone: (808) 768-5003
ianderson@honolulu.gov

District 4
Hawaii Kai, Kuliouou, Niu Valley, Aina Haina, Wailupe, Waialae-Iki, Kalani Valley, Kahala, Wilhemina Rise, a portion of Kapahulu, a portion of Kaimuki, Diamond Head, Waikiki and a portion of Ala Moana

Stanley Chang
phone: (808) 768-5004
ccldistrict4@honolulu.gov

District 5
A portion of Kapahulu and Kaimuki; Palolo Valley, St. Louis Heights, Manoa, Moiliili, McCully, Kakaako, and a portion of Ala Moana and Makiki

Ann Kobayashi
phone: (808) 768-5005
akobayashi@honolulu.gov

District 6
A portion of Makiki, Downtown Honolulu, Punchbowl, Liliha, Pauoa Valley, Nuuanu, Alewa Heights, Papakolea, Kalihi Valley and a portion of Kalihi

Carol Fukunaga
phone: (808) 768-5006
cafukunaga@honolulu.gov

District 7
A portion of upper Kalihi, Kapalama, Palama, Iwilei, Kalihi Kai, Sand Island, Mapunapuna, Airport, Hickam, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island, Aliamanu, Salt Lake, Foster Village, Stadium and Halawa Valley Estates

Joey Manahan
phone: (808) 768-5007
jmanahan@honolulu.gov

District 8
Fort Shafter, Moanalua, Halawa, Aiea, Waimalu, Pearl City, Pearl City Peninsula, Seaview, Crestview and Waipio Gentry.

Breene Harimoto
phone: (808) 768-5008
bharimoto@honolulu.gov

District 9
Waikele, Waipahu, Village Park, Makakilo, Kunia, and Mililani Town

Ron Menor
phone: (808) 768-5009
rmenor@honolulu.gov

Key Committees

The general council meetings are held once a month at the Honolulu Hale at 10:00 a.m., they vary from time to time but the schedule is always posted six days in advance, for more information call (808) 547-7000. The committees are a way for the council to work on their proposals and run the city more efficiently.

Safety, Economic Development and Government Affairs Committee

The Safety, Economic Development and Government Affairs Committee deals with the police and fire departments. It meets on Tuesdays at 9 a.m.

Parks and Cultural Affairs Committee

The Parks and Cultural Affairs Committee meets on Tuesdays at 10:30 a.m.

Executive Matters and Legal Affairs Committee

The Executive Matters and Legal Affairs Committee deals with the mayor, the legal departments, prosecutor’s office, and the laws the council itself passes. It meets on Tuesdays at 1 p.m.

Budget Committee

The Budget Committee ensures the allocation of city resources as per the approved budget. It meets on Wednesdays at 9 a.m.

Public Works and Sustainability Committee

The Public Works and Sustainability Committee primarily focuses on the roads, and public facilities. It meets on Wednesdays at 1 p.m.

Zoning and Planning Committee

The Zoning and Planning Committee‘s purpose is to regulate current private and commercial zoning districts and deals with projects approvals and urban planning. It meets on Thursdays at 9 a.m.

Transportation Committee

The Transportation Committee focuses on the bus, the road repairs and design, as well as the Rail project. It meets on Thursdays at 1 p.m.

Have feedback? Suggestions? Email Us!

Honolulu City Council
Honolulu City Council Considers Regulating ‘Monster Homes’ Shafkat Anowar/Civil Beat

Honolulu City Council Considers Regulating ‘Monster Homes’

Neighbors complain about homes with 15 or more bedrooms, but they’re defended by a man who said they serve multigenerational households.

Council Panel Votes To Prohibit Lying Down At Honolulu Bus Stops Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Council Panel Votes To Prohibit Lying Down At Honolulu Bus Stops

But the committee postponed action on a measure to extend the sit-lie ban to areas around schools and libraries.

New Council Proposal Cuts Back Fire Sprinkler Requirements Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

New Council Proposal Cuts Back Fire Sprinkler Requirements

Only about half as many high rises built before 1975 would have to be retrofitted under an amended version of the measure.

Recycle Or Incinerate? The Battle Of The Blue Bins Richard Wiens/Civil Beat

Recycle Or Incinerate? The Battle Of The Blue Bins

Burning more discards could save money as recycling gets more expensive, but environmentalists say it’s the cost of caring for the planet.

Honolulu Council Committee Shoots Down Islandwide Sit-Lie Ban Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Honolulu Council Committee Shoots Down Islandwide Sit-Lie Ban

The panel tinkered with homelessness proposals, shifting from the concept of safe zones to tiny homes.

Tax Breaks Proposed For Organic Farms And ‘Ocean Friendly’ Restaurants Martha Cheng

Tax Breaks Proposed For Organic Farms And ‘Ocean Friendly’ Restaurants

Councilwoman Kymberly Pine is also still pushing a measure to ban plastic foam takeout containers.

Hawaii Officials To The Homeless: Go Away Natanya Freidheim/Civil Beat

Hawaii Officials To The Homeless: Go Away

An islandwide ban on sitting or lying on public sidewalks is among a slew of new bills aimed at moving homeless people out of public places.

Overtime Costs Keep Going Up For Honolulu City Government Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Overtime Costs Keep Going Up For Honolulu City Government

The expense of paying workers time and a half increased 30 percent in the last five years, reaching $67 million in fiscal year 2017.

Some Honolulu High Rises Don’t Need Sprinklers, Fire Safety Panel Says Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Some Honolulu High Rises Don’t Need Sprinklers, Fire Safety Panel Says

Residential buildings could each be evaluated to determine if a sprinkler retrofitting is necessary, a City Council committee is told.

$2.4 Billion Rail Rescue Plan Clears Another Senate Hurdle Cory Lum/Civil Beat

$2.4 Billion Rail Rescue Plan Clears Another Senate Hurdle

UPDATED: The proposal to raise hotel taxes and extend the GET next faces another vote by the full Senate on Wednesday, then likely House consideration.

Council Committee Defers Proposal To Develop Haleiwa Farmland Anthony Quintano/ Civil Beat

Council Committee Defers Proposal To Develop Haleiwa Farmland

Two bills would have rezoned seven acres of agricultural land to urban or residential and allowed for up to 35 homes

Honolulu Council Considers Another Expansion Of Sit-Lie Ban Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Honolulu Council Considers Another Expansion Of Sit-Lie Ban

To avoid legal challenges, the latest measure to keep the homeless off busy city sidewalks would apply only to commercial streets.