Will Espero

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Will Espero is the Majority Floor Leader in the Hawaii State Senate. He represented District 20, which stretched from lower Waipahu to Ewa Beach, where Espero resides. Due to the reapportionment of Hawaii’s districts, Espero is running for the District 19 seat in the 2012 elections to continue to represent Ewa Beach. He will face Roger Lacuesta, a fellow Democrat, in the August 11 primary.

Espero is a member of the committees on Ways and Means, and Transportation and International Affairs. As chair of the Committee on Public Safety, Government Operations, and Military Affairs, he has advocated for judicial reform.

Espero was born on a U.S. naval base on November 6, 1960 in Yokosuka, Japan. He studied Business Administration at Seattle University, graduating with a B.A. in 1982.

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Will Espero
Pod Squad: Why Will Espero Wants To Be Our LG

Pod Squad: Why Will Espero Wants To Be Our LG

An 18-year veteran of the Hawaii Legislature, the state senator hopes to make the jump to lieutenant governor.

Hanabusa Gears Up For Gubernatorial Race Against Ige Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Hanabusa Gears Up For Gubernatorial Race Against Ige

The congresswoman files papers to form a campaign committee. Meanwhile, state senators Will Espero and Josh Green are running for lieutenant government.

Hawaii Lawmakers Are Still Chilly To Police Reform Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Lawmakers Are Still Chilly To Police Reform

Despite ongoing problems in county police agencies, legislators are rejecting more accountability.

Senator: ‘Silent’ Police Commission Should Stay Quiet A Bit Longer Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Senator: ‘Silent’ Police Commission Should Stay Quiet A Bit Longer

Will Espero urges the commission to wait until a federal investigation is finished before making a deal for Chief Louis Kealoha’s departure.

Why Hawaii Has A Double Standard On Isolating Prisoners Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Why Hawaii Has A Double Standard On Isolating Prisoners

Hawaii lets its for-profit prison contractor set its own rules for what it terms “disciplinary segregation,” instead of solitary confinement.

Hawaii First State To Link Firearms Owners To FBI Database Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii First State To Link Firearms Owners To FBI Database

Gov. Ige signed legislation authorizing county police departments to enroll firearms applicants and individuals registering firearms in a federal service that monitors criminal records.

Hawaii Doesn’t Know If Prisoners Sent To Mainland Are Likelier To Reoffend Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Doesn’t Know If Prisoners Sent To Mainland Are Likelier To Reoffend

The state has little data on the effect of shipping prisoners to Arizona, but studies say a lack of family contact makes it harder to go straight.

Why Is It So Hard To Pass Police Reform In Hawaii? Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Why Is It So Hard To Pass Police Reform In Hawaii?

Lawmakers concede that tougher police accountability measures haven’t been a priority despite numerous high-profile cases of serious misconduct.

Is Hawaii Really Saving Millions By Using A Mainland Prison? Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Is Hawaii Really Saving Millions By Using A Mainland Prison?

Many of the costs the state pays aren’t detailed in budget documents. And the expense is not the only issue.

Hawaii Keeps Secret What Happens In Its Private Prison Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Keeps Secret What Happens In Its Private Prison

Even when prisoners are murdered, state officials and their private contractor shield themselves from the public eye.

Future Of Hawaii Capitol’s Reflecting Pools Is As Murky As The Water Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Future Of Hawaii Capitol’s Reflecting Pools Is As Murky As The Water

Dead fish float in the greenish-brown pools, which have long been a headache for state maintenance workers.
Criminal Justice Reform Fails To Get Much Legislative Love Flickr: James Cridland

Criminal Justice Reform Fails To Get Much Legislative Love

Neighbor island facilities received some significant financial help, but the state’s main facilities on Oahu will remain overcrowded and crumbling.