To quote the old pop song, “Sign, sign, everywhere a sign!”

So many political campaign signs have been cropping up along state right of ways that the Hawaii Department of Transportation has issued a reminder that it’s a no-no.

It issued a press release Wednesday explaining that “outdoor advertising, including political campaign signage, is prohibited on the state right of way.”

In the last month alone, highways maintenance staff have removed more than 200 signs from areas of DOT jurisdiction, “which takes time and resources away from other maintenance duties.”

A lonely Donald Trump campaign sign on the Big Island.

A lonely Donald Trump campaign sign on the Big Island.

Courtesy of Dylan Nonaka

Here are the exceptions to rules, says DOT:

  • directional and other official signs and notices, which signs and notices shall include, but not be limited to, signs and notices pertaining to natural wonders, scenic and historic attractions as authorized or required by law;
  • signs, displays, and devices advertising the sale or lease of the property upon which they are located;
  • signs, displays, and devices advertising activities conducted on the property upon which they are located; and
  • signs lawfully in existence on Oct. 22, 1965, determined by the director to be landmark signs, including signs on farm structures or natural surfaces, of historic or artistic significance.

Here’s the state law prohibiting the installation of signs.

And here’s the federal Highway Beautification Act of 1965.

To report an illegally placed sign in DOT jurisdiction, contact the Highways Maintenance Hotline at (808) 831-6714 or email to MSWClerk@hawaii.gov.

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