Civil Beat Staff

Anita Hofschneider

Anita Hofschneider is a reporter covering social issues for Civil Beat. She writes about the high cost of housing and challenges facing recent immigrants and Native Hawaiians. She previously covered city and state politics.

Her work has won multiple national, regional and local awards. The Associated Press Media Editors and Asian American Journalists Association recently honored her reporting on sexual abuse in Guam’s Catholic church.

Prior to starting at Civil Beat, Anita covered the 2013 Hawaii legislative session for the Associated Press and interned at the Wall Street Journal in New York. She graduated from Harvard with honors in 2012.

You can follow Anita on Twitter @ahofschneider, on Instagram @anitahofschneider or email her at ahofschneider@civilbeat.org.

Senators: Some Cabinet Nominees Won’t Make It Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Senators: Some Cabinet Nominees Won’t Make It

Some Hawaii senators say they aren’t inclined to confirm the governor’s choices for Department of Hawaiian Home Lands, Department of Budget and Finance and the Department of Public Safety.

What Life Is Like For Five Families Two Months After The Worst Storm Of 2018 Anita Hofschneider/Civil Beat

What Life Is Like For Five Families Two Months After The Worst Storm Of 2018

Thousands of people in the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands are still waiting to rebuild their homes after Super Typhoon Yutu.

Homelessness Coordinator Touts Progress As Lawmakers Criticize Pace Of Work Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Homelessness Coordinator Touts Progress As Lawmakers Criticize Pace Of Work

Hawaii homelessness has decreased two years in a row, said Scott Morishige, but legislators contend the administration isn’t spending money fast enough.

‘From Something To Nothing’: Life In Saipan After Super Typhoon Yutu

‘From Something To Nothing’: Life In Saipan After Super Typhoon Yutu

Thousands are still homeless and some have left the Northern Mariana Islands after the most powerful storm of 2018 devastated the U.S. commonwealth.

Why Critics Say New House Sexual Harassment Policy Doesn’t Go Far Enough Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Why Critics Say New House Sexual Harassment Policy Doesn’t Go Far Enough

They say the policy is a “good first step” that meets many national best practices, but it lacks an appeals process and requires secrecy even after cases are resolved.

Lawsuit Filed By Injured Chinese Workers Against Saipan Casino Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Lawsuit Filed By Injured Chinese Workers Against Saipan Casino

The casino previously received a hefty OSHA fine for hazardous workplace conditions and was cited for paying workers less than the minimum wage.

Study: Chuukese Patients In Hawaii Often Face Discrimination Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Study: Chuukese Patients In Hawaii Often Face Discrimination

Micronesians face language and cultural barriers when seeking medical care, and are far less likely to have insurance coverage.

No One Is Speaking Up For Hawaii’s Renters Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

No One Is Speaking Up For Hawaii’s Renters

There is no organization dedicated to advocating for the rights of tenants, and a new study finds they lose nearly every eviction case.

More Burglaries, Fewer Rapes Reported At UH Manoa Cory Lum/Civil Beat

More Burglaries, Fewer Rapes Reported At UH Manoa

Newly released statistics show the number of reported rapes dropped from 13 in 2016 to seven in 2017.

Census: The Gap Between Rich And Poor In Hawaii Is Growing Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Census: The Gap Between Rich And Poor In Hawaii Is Growing

Home values and household income in Hawaii vary widely depending on where you live.

Hawaii Hotels And Union Reach Agreement On Contract Anita Hofschneider/Civil Beat

Hawaii Hotels And Union Reach Agreement On Contract

The agreement boosts workers’ pay by $1.50 per hour and ends the longest Hawaii hotel strike since 1970, according to Unite Here Local 5.

Federal Report: No Evidence That Agent Orange Was Used On Guam Courtesy of Brian Moyer

Federal Report: No Evidence That Agent Orange Was Used On Guam

A group of veterans have been fighting to get health benefits for illnesses they say are associated with exposure to the dangerous herbicide.