HONOLULU (AP) — More than 100,000 rides were taken last month through Honolulu’s self-service bicycle rental platform, marking a record number of rides in single month, the operator said.

Bikeshare Hawaii, the manager of Biki, is planning to add 300 more bikes and about 30 more rental stations by the end of the year.

Biki launched in June 2017, offering about 1,000 rental bikes at 100 stations throughout urban Honolulu. Biki has since recorded more than 1 million rides.

The ridership last month increased by 62 percent compared to October 2017.

“We are very pleased with the record number of rides taken in October, especially compared to the numbers from last year,” said Todd Boulanger, Bikeshare Hawaii executive director. “This progress demonstrates that both Honolulu residents and visitors are seeing the benefits of Biki and that it’s a viable transportation option for short trips around town.”

Biki bicycle sharing bikes are ceremoniously blessed with rainwater and ti leaf on the lawn at the Capitol.

Biki bicyles are ceremoniously blessed with rainwater and ti leaf on the lawn at the Capitol in 2017. The bike-sharing program is enormously popular, with ridership up 62 percent from the year before.

Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The service began with funding and support from the city, state and public institutions. The expansion will be supported by funding from the federal Transportation Alternative Program.

Biki plans to reach more neighborhoods, including Iwilei, Makiki and Waikiki, as well as better equip the city’s urban core, Bikeshare Hawaii said. The proposed locations for the expansion were shared late last year, and community feedback has informed the selected locations, it said.

“We are very encouraged both by a successful first year of service and record-breaking rides since then, and look forward to servicing more residents and visitors with these expanded sites,” Boulanger said.

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