Hawaii health officials reported 56 new COVID-19 cases on Monday, the lowest number of cases since Aug. 2.

Of the 56 new cases reported on Monday, seven were on Hawaii island and the rest were on Oahu.

Six people have died at the Yukio Okutsu State Veterans Home in Hilo since Friday, bringing the total deaths associated with the nursing home to 24 as of Monday morning.

On Sunday, U.S. Sen. Brian Schatz said it is “infuriating” that the private operator of the veterans home failed to implement basic infection control practices months after the COVID-19 pandemic beg

In the last week, an average of 98 new cases has been reported daily, the first time the seven-day running average has dipped below 100 in nearly two months.

As of Sunday, intensive care beds were at 65% capacity and 185 people in Hawaii were hospitalized with the virus, Lt. Gov. Josh Green said on Instagram.

In the last week, 1.9% of tests had come back positive. The lower weekly test positivity rate is still partially due to the federal testing surge that ended Monday. Only 0.6% of surge tests were positive, and those results had been contributing to a lower overall positivity rate. The batch of results reported Sunday had a 4.6% positivity rate, according to Green.

Half of all virus cases in Hawaii to date have been among people under the age of 40, and nearly 10% — or 1,172 — cases have been children under the age of 17. Only three children have been hospitalized to date.

For more information, check the Hawaii Department of Health COVID-19 site and the Hawaii Data Collaborative COVID-19 Tracking site.

Cases, Deaths And COVID-19 Testing In Hawaii

11,459
COVID-19 Cases
130
Deaths
387,200
Tests Performed

Hawaii COVID-19 Cases By County

Daily New COVID-19 Cases

Number Of Confirmed COVID-19 Cases In U.S.

COVID-19 Cases Worldwide

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