John Pritchett: A Political Train Wreck - Honolulu Civil Beat

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About the Author

John Pritchett

John Pritchett is an award-winning cartoonist. He has created artwork in Hawaii for decades, including 20 years at the Honolulu Weekly. See his portfolio on the web at: pritchettcartoons.com. Opinions are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Civil Beat’s views.


Read more about the Honolulu mayor’s race and the candidates positions. Two contenders — Keith Amemiya and Rick Blangiardi — will face off in the Nov. 3 general election.


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About the Author

John Pritchett

John Pritchett is an award-winning cartoonist. He has created artwork in Hawaii for decades, including 20 years at the Honolulu Weekly. See his portfolio on the web at: pritchettcartoons.com. Opinions are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Civil Beat’s views.


Latest Comments (0)

Not only is the pandemic exhibiting how mass transit, including rail is affected by lower ridership, but it is also show casing how working from home for many has decreased the amount of traffic on the highways and streets right now.  With traffic at managable levels, far beyond our expectations, it also reveals that rail is already a forgone conclusion before the first car has even left the station.  Rail is officially obsolete, so why waste another dime on it?  There in lies the real reason rail was conceived.  The development of the urban core.  Follow the money, watch as dozens of high end condos arise out of the ground along Kapiolani Blvd. and in Kaka'ako.  There is your reason rail was contrived.  

wailani1961 · 1 year ago

Rail is perfect for people who want to travel from stationto station and not for people who travel from home to work.  The heaviest traffic will be pick up and drop off at the stations.  Rail cannot function in case of anotherpandemic.  Social distancing would kill off the rail beforemulti-billion expenses do.  Maintaining cost of rail will be the achilles heel here.

6_Pence · 1 year ago

Stop the train at Middle.  Use direct connecting busesto complete the journeys  We have a transit hub at Middle  already.  End the senseless spending already!

6_Pence · 1 year ago

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