John Pritchett: On The Chopping Block - Honolulu Civil Beat

To ensure our nonprofit newsroom has the resources next year to continue our impactful reporting, we need to welcome 700 new donors and raise $225,000 by December 31.

We have raised $83,000 from 1,460 donors, including 196 new donors. Mahalo!

Donate

To ensure our nonprofit newsroom has the resources next year to continue our impactful reporting, we need to welcome 700 new donors and raise $225,000 by December 31.

We have raised $83,000 from 1,460 donors, including 196 new donors. Mahalo!

Donate


About the Author

John Pritchett

John Pritchett is an award-winning cartoonist. He has created artwork in Hawaii for decades, including 20 years at the Honolulu Weekly. See his portfolio on the web at: pritchettcartoons.com. Opinions are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Civil Beat’s views.


Want more context? Read this story about the congressional hearing on Google, Facebook and Twitter.


Read this next:

Lee Cataluna: Can Maui Find Economic Success Online?


Not a subscription

Civil Beat is a small nonprofit newsroom, and we’re committed to a paywall-free website and subscription-free content because we believe in journalism as a public service. That’s why donations from readers like you are essential to our continued existence.

Help keep our journalism free for all readers by becoming a monthly member of Civil Beat today.

Contribute

About the Author

John Pritchett

John Pritchett is an award-winning cartoonist. He has created artwork in Hawaii for decades, including 20 years at the Honolulu Weekly. See his portfolio on the web at: pritchettcartoons.com. Opinions are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Civil Beat’s views.


Latest Comments (0)

Who isn’t Schatz asking questions ?It would be interesting to know how much these tech firms contributed to his campaign. 

tokenhoale · 1 year ago

I started in the computer business in 1977, and like most of the geeks back then, I dreamed about how this technology would change the world. Well, that dream came true, but it turned into a nightmare. The problem isn't the technology itself, it's how we use it.We thought we could break the monopoly government and business had on information. Instead, it appears we gave them better more efficient tools to further monopolize, and monetize, that information.You now hold in your hand devices that give you the ability to talk, one on one, with people from around the world. Taking advantage of that you would no doubt find that regardless of where people live, who they are, or what they believe, they're really not that much different than you are.Instead, too many people use this technology to filter out any thoughts or ideas they don't agree with and use the anonymity of the internet to give full voice to their inner demons on a global scale.I'm hopeful it's just a learning curve kind of thing. As people get better at using this technology, this nightmare of 7/24 rage and hatred will give way to us old geeks dream of bringing people closer together.

toleolu · 1 year ago

Join the conversation

About IDEAS

IDEAS is the place you'll find essays, analysis and opinion on every aspect of life and public affairs in Hawaii. We want to showcase smart ideas about the future of Hawaii, from the state's sharpest thinkers, to stretch our collective thinking about a problem or an issue. Email news@civilbeat.org to submit an idea.

Mahalo!

You're officially signed up for our daily newsletter, the Morning Beat. A confirmation email will arrive shortly.

In the meantime, we have other newsletters that you might enjoy. Check the boxes for emails you'd like to receive.

  • What's this? Be the first to hear about important news stories with these occasional emails.
  • What's this? You'll hear from us whenever Civil Beat publishes a major project or investigation.
  • What's this? Get our latest environmental news on a monthly basis, including updates on Nathan Eagle's 'Hawaii 2040' series.
  • What's this? Get occasional emails highlighting essays, analysis and opinion from IDEAS, Civil Beat's commentary section.

Inbox overcrowded? Don't worry, you can unsubscribe
or update your preferences at any time.