John Pritchett: Nightmare On Beretania Street - Honolulu Civil Beat

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About the Author

John Pritchett

John Pritchett is an award-winning cartoonist. He has created artwork in Hawaii for decades, including 20 years at the Honolulu Weekly. See his portfolio on the web at: pritchettcartoons.com. Opinions are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Civil Beat’s views.


Need more context? “Proposed Reapportionment Plans For Oahu Could Mean Painful Political Fallout


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About the Author

John Pritchett

John Pritchett is an award-winning cartoonist. He has created artwork in Hawaii for decades, including 20 years at the Honolulu Weekly. See his portfolio on the web at: pritchettcartoons.com. Opinions are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Civil Beat’s views.


Latest Comments (0)

The process is definitely "bi-partisan." Republican Minority Leader Gene Ward is an equal partner with Democratic Speaker Scott Saiki in telling their appointees how to draw the lines.While the law says redistricting shall not be done to favor any individual or "faction" (a word consciously chosen instead of "party"), the actual structure of appointing commissioners empowers the 4 leaders legislative leaders: Speaker, House Minority Leader, Senate President and Senate Minority Leader. No provision was built-in to protect individual lawmakers who are not aligned with those people.The phrase "dissidents" has limited utility here. There is no longer a cohesive "dissident" faction in the House. There is a Progressive Caucus, but some of its members are aligned with the dominant Saiki-Luke grouping. Some of the incumbents clearly targeted in the proposed redistricting were aligned with Speaker Say: Mark Hashem and Gregg Takayama and are not part of a "progressive" dissident faction. But cannot be counted upon to constantly toe the line of leadership. Roy Takumi was targeted because he has, in the past, been seen as having enough stature to be a potential rival for Speakership.

Bart808 · 1 month ago

if the lines are truly drawn based on population there should be no threats and accusations of gerrymandering.  Does a line actually matter for our elected officials to do their elected job?  Evidently representing someone 2 blocks down makes a difference. 

surferx808 · 1 month ago

The illustrations stitching is far too logical & orderly to resemble the district stitching.I would expect some creative zig zagging, Uturns & elbow bends holding the creature together.A top view of the stitching viewed at a distance might give the illusion of an extended middle figure to capture the spirit of the monster.

jminitera · 1 month ago

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