As of 2013, Hawaii had the highest level of homelessness among the states, second only to Washington, D.C., in the United States.

This is based off of January 2013 estimate of homelessness by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. On any given night in January 2013, 610,042 people were homeless in the U.S.

By 2014, Oahu alone had more than 4,700 homeless residents.  According to the 2013 data, Hawaii also had the fifth-highest rate of homeless residents who were unsheltered, at 76.9 percent. California had the highest rate of unsheltered homeless, at 86.6 percent.

See the map below and hover over each state to see different rates of homelessness.

This Thursday at 6 p.m., Civil Beat will host a Civil Cafe focusing on what’s being done and what needs to be done.

Join us as we talk to four key players in solving Hawaii homelessness:

  • Colin Kippen, Hawaii Coordinator on Homelessness
  • Jun Yang, Honolulu Executive Director of Housing
  • Joy Rucker, Waikiki Health Center Director of Community Services
  • Jerry Coffee, The Institute for Human Services Clinical Director
The discussion will take place at Fresh Cafe in Kakaako, 831 Queen St. It will be livestreamed on our website, and broadcast on Channel 54 through our partner, Olelo Community Media.

Civil Beat will use this discussion as an opportunity to raise funds for Hale Kipa, a nonprofit that has served more than 30,000 homeless and at-risk youths in Hawaii for more than 40 years

If you can’t make it to the event, you can also make a donation online.

Please RSVP here, and we look forward to a civil and insightful discussion on one of the most persistent and growing issues facing Hawaii today.

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