Republican Donald Trump and Democrat Hillary Clinton are the least popular set of presidential finalists in recent memory.

But both have benefited from Hawaii financial donors — especially Clinton, according to Federal Election Commission records.

All told, individual donors in the Aloha State contributed a total of $2.2 million to 20 presidential candidates in 2015 and 2016.

Democrats received the lion’s share of donations ($1,583,414) and Clinton, the former secretary of state, received about two-thirds of that amount ($954,323).

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton

Presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Wikimedia Commons

Bernie Sanders, the independent U.S. senator from Vermont who ran as a Democrat and lost to Clinton in the primaries, received $604,805 — more money than went to over a dozen GOP candidates.

Republicans got a total of $590,090. Trump, the New York businessman, got the most ($223,254). Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas was second with $131,083.

Hawaii Elections Guide 2016

If Clinton and Trump donors from Hawaii share a trait, it is that many of them are retired, according to the FEC.

Some contributors are familiar names from a cross-section of professions. They aren’t necessarily the largest or smallest contributors, just people you might know:

Clinton donors include Alexander & Baldwin executives Chris Benjamin ($1,250), Paul Ito ($1,000) and Meredith Ching ($500); Honolulu City Councilwoman Carol Fukunaga ($241), legislators Roz Baker ($2,543), Bertrand Kobayashi ($250), Lorraine Inouye ($1,317), Chris Lee ($250) and Josh Green ($250); lobbyists Blake Oshiro ($1,000) and Bruce Coppa ($1,000); Ige administration staffer Cindy McMillan ($250); Hawaii energy administrator Mark Glick ($1,250); Hawaiian Electric executive Connie Lau ($2,700); and blogger and journalist Ian Lind ($250). Lind is a Civil Beat columnist.

Also donating to Clinton from Hawaii were banker Eric Yeaman ($1,500), retired judges Steve Levinson ($1,500) and Marie Milks ($145), consultant Jennifer Sabas ($1,000), labor leader Mel Kahele ($120), U.S. Attorney Florence Nakakuni ($2,230), City and County of Honolulu auditor Edwin Young ($400), businessman Jeff Stone ($2,700), Bert Kobayashi ($2,700) and Bert Kobayashi Jr. ($1,000); and attorneys Sherry Broder ($1,000), Mitchell Imanaka ($1,000), David Louie ($1,750), Michael Livingston ($2,700), Wayne Parsons ($3,200) and Judith Pavey ($2,500).

Trump donors include rail opponent Cliff Slater ($800), lawmaker Bob McDermott ($40), Clark Roofing executive Cindy Sue Clark ($2,700), tax planner Janell Israel ($400), Paradise Cruise executive Ron Howard ($1,600), Honolulu Police Maj. Lester Hite ($100), Monsanto executive Alvin Pelayo ($200) and attorneys Adrienne King ($3,336), Ian Sandison ($200) and Gregory Frey ($147).

This article does not include individual donations to political action committees, political parties and congressional candidates.

But the Center for Responsive Politics (aka Open Secrets) says that, as of Oct. 28, total itemized contributions from Hawaii amounted to $6,852,286.

Nearly fourth-fifths went to Democrats, the second-highest percentage in the country.

In the Open Secrets table below, the “rank” column compares Hawaii to all 50 states:

Federal financial donations from Hawaii 2015-2016. Source: Open Secrets. ** This figure includes PAC contributions to candidates, individual contributions ($200+) to candidates and parties, and Levin fund contributions to parties. To avoid double-counting, it does not include individual (hard money) contributions to PACs, but does include individual (soft money) contributions to outside spending groups, including super PACs. * This figure includes individual contributions to candidates, PACs, outside spending groups (including super PACs) and party committees. † Percents to Democrats and Republicans calculated out of Total to Parties and Candidates only.

Federal financial donations from Hawaii 2015-2016. Source: Open Secrets.
** This figure includes PAC contributions to candidates, individual contributions ($200+) to candidates and parties, and Levin fund contributions to parties. To avoid double-counting, it does not include individual (hard money) contributions to PACs, but does include individual (soft money) contributions to outside spending groups, including super PACs.
* This figure includes individual contributions to candidates, PACs, outside spending groups (including super PACs) and party committees.
† Percents to Democrats and Republicans calculated out of Total to Parties and Candidates only.

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