Hawaii is poised to challenge President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration as early as Wednesday — more than a week before the newly revised travel ban is set to take effect.

In court filings on Tuesday, the Hawaii Department of the Attorney General said it intends to amend the state’s ongoing lawsuit against the original travel ban to challenge the new order, which was issued Monday and set to take effect in nine days.

Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin, who spoke Tuesday at a gathering of religious and community organizations at the Muslim Association of Hawaii, is set to challenge President Donald Trump’s executive order on immigration this week.

Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Hawaii sued the Trump administration on Feb. 3, the same day that U.S. District Court Judge James Robart in Seattle issued a temporary restraining order to put the travel ban on hold nationwide.

But Watson suspended Hawaii’s lawsuit four days later, pending the fate of Robart’s temporary restraining order.

In light of the new order, however, Hawaii Attorney General Doug Chin is asking Watson to lift his stay and allow the state to file an amended complaint, as well as a motion for a temporary restraining order, to keep the travel ban from taking effect.

UPDATE: Watson agreed Wednesday to let Chin amend Hawaii’s lawsuit to challenge the new order, setting the stage for an oral argument and an initial ruling a day before the travel ban is set to take effect.

On Tuesday, Chin told Civil Beat that he wants to get the court involved as soon as possible.

“What we see is that, the best thing to do is to challenge it now, before the ban takes effect,” Chin said, after speaking at a gathering of religious and community organizations at the Muslim Association of Hawaii.

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell, who convened the gathering to denounce hate crimes and “discrimination in all forms,” praised Chin’s work on Hawaii’s lawsuit.

“We’ve seen him step up in the past month,” Caldwell said. “I felt so proud. I know we all did. He’s fighting for all of us, no matter what our religious views are.”

Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell convened a gathering of religious and community organizations to denounce hate crimes and 'discrimination in all forms.'

Mateo Caballero, legal director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Hawaii, condemned the new order, declaring that it’s “still unconstitutional.”

“Trump has recommitted himself to religious discrimination. He can expect continued disapproval from people and the courts,” Caballero said. “Freedom of religion is enshrined in our Constitution, and no one should be discriminated against on the basis of how they look or how they choose to pray.”

Chin was just as blunt about the travel ban.

“It’s really about discrimination. It’s about discriminating against people based upon national origin or based upon religion,” Chin said. “It’s disenfranchising people who are not of the majority race or majority religion, and it’s putting them in a place that smears their culture or puts them in a place that’s not accepted by everybody else. That’s wrong.”

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