The Hawaii Department of Health urged people at high risk for monkeypox to get vaccinated as the state has reported 16 cases of the disease since June 3.

On Tuesday, the state expanded eligibility for the vaccine for Hawaii residents who are at least 18 years old. The department said it has received about 2,800 doses of the Jynneos vaccine and administered more than 1,000 doses.

“As more vaccine doses become available, we are expanding vaccine eligibility to communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this outbreak and individuals who are at risk for severe illness,” deputy state epidemiologist Nathan Tan said in a press release.

The DOH listed the criteria for eligibility as Hawaii residents who have come into close contact with someone who has been infected or is suspected to have been infected with monkeypox in the last 14 days; men who have sex with men or are transgender individuals with multiple sex partners; people who have certain immune or skin conditions and have a household member or sex partner at high risk for the disease. Patients must be at least 18 years old to get the vaccine.

Hawaii announced four more monkeypox cases on Tuesday, raising the total to 16. The latest cases include three Oahu residents and a non-resident who was diagnosed on Kauai.

“As more vaccine doses become available, we are expanding vaccine eligibility to communities that have been disproportionately impacted by this outbreak and individuals who are at risk for severe illness,” said Deputy State Epidemiologist Dr. Nathan Tan. “While the risk to most Hawaiʻi residents remains low, we encourage all eligible individuals to get vaccinated to prevent further transmission and protect our community.”

The vaccine is administered in two doses about four weeks apart. The DOH will host a vaccination clinic at the Blaisdell Center from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Individuals must schedule an appointment online or over the phone beforehand.

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