The Environmental Protection Agency on Thursday announced a nearly $220,000 fine against Par Hawaii Refinery, LLC for violations of the federal Clean Air and Resource Conservation and Recovery Acts at the company’s Kapolei refinery facilities.

The violations date back to September 2018, when an EPA inspector found hazardous waste being improperly managed at Par Hawaii’s Komohana Street facility, according to an agency release. Specifically, the inspector found an “oily residue” being released onto unlined asphalt and into the soil there, the release stated.

The EPA said “contaminants of concern” in that incident were hexavalent chromium and benzene, which can leak into the environment and groundwater when waste isn’t handled properly.

Campbell Industrial Park aerial Aulani Hotel Ihilani hotel.

Par Hawaii’s refinery is located at the Campbell Industrial Park in Kapolei, on Oahu’s west side. The EPA announced a nearly $220,000 fine against the company Thursday for violations in 2018 and 2019.

Cory Lum/Civil Beat

In March 2019, the EPA found separate violations of the Clean Air Act’s chemical accident prevention requirements, the release stated. Specifically, the company had “inaccurate maximum inventories” for its crude vessels as well as inaccurate piping and machine diagrams, among other issues, according to the agency.

In an emailed statement, Par Hawaii Director of Government and Public Affairs Peter Boylan said “we are pleased to have resolved the EPA’s concerns regarding certain alleged documentation deficiencies at our Par West Refinery, as well as the alleged release at our Par East Refinery.”

Boylan said the company disagrees with the EPA’s “assertions,” but he added that the settlement resolves the matter and “we look forward to continuing our support of the state’s transition to its clean energy goals.”

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