Civil Beat Staff

Marcel Honore

Marcel Honore primarily covers rail for Civil Beat — and he’s always on the lookout for ways to describe the local transit project other than “cash-strapped,” “beleaguered” and “financially challenged” in his reports.

A native of Los Angeles, Marcel moved to Oahu in January 2013 and spent nearly five years covering transportation for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. He also served as the paper’s main correspondent covering the Hokule’a’s three-year worldwide voyage, sailing aboard the canoe on several of its international legs.

Prior to his Hawaii arrival, Marcel worked at the Palm Springs, California, Desert Sun, where he covered city government and immigration issues. His investigations into arsenic-tinged drinking water, foul odors emanating from a contaminated-soil facility and other environmental challenges affecting that region garnered several awards, including a 2011 California Newspaper Publishers Award.

Marcel started his journalism career as a graduate student at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, where he served as a Washington, D.C., correspondent for The Seattle Times and the Santa Barbara News-Press. While at Northwestern he also worked at the Associated Press’ Caracas, Venezuela, bureau covering policies under then-President Hugo Chavez.

Marcel should be a much better surfer than he currently is. He sincerely apologizes for dropping in on your wave.

Hawaii Longline Fleet’s Switch To Shark-Friendly Gear Taking Longer Than Expected Courtesy: Kaikea Nakachi

Hawaii Longline Fleet’s Switch To Shark-Friendly Gear Taking Longer Than Expected

The transition was supposed to be done by July. Now, expect it done by the end of the year, an industry leader says.

HART Sheds More Staff, Including Its Latest Chief Financial Officer Cory Lum/Civil Beat

HART Sheds More Staff, Including Its Latest Chief Financial Officer

The changes come amid the HART board’s private discussions on future leadership at the agency.

HART, HECO At Odds Over Who Caused A $34 Million Change Order To Rail Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

HART, HECO At Odds Over Who Caused A $34 Million Change Order To Rail

HART says HECO’s new safety standards were the problem. The utility, meanwhile, blames shoddy and delayed design work by a rail contractor.

Investigation Uncovers Numerous ADA Violations In Hawaii Island’s Transit Service Jason Armstrong/Civil Beat

Investigation Uncovers Numerous ADA Violations In Hawaii Island’s Transit Service

The county agrees to fix “chronically inoperable” wheelchair lifts and make other changes to avoid getting sued.

Rail Canopy Defects Cost Another $15 Million. Are Taxpayers Liable? Marcel Honore/Civil Beat

Rail Canopy Defects Cost Another $15 Million. Are Taxpayers Liable?

The canopy arms have caused numerous problems. It’s not yet clear who’s responsible and who ultimately should pay to fix them.

HART Warns That Wandering On The Electrified Rail Line Could Be Deadly Courtesy: Honolulu Authority for Rapid Transportation

HART Warns That Wandering On The Electrified Rail Line Could Be Deadly

A group of trespassers recently breached a station and wandered onto the elevated track, prompting the warning.

Narrow Council Vote Propels Anthony Aalto Onto The HART Board Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2016

Narrow Council Vote Propels Anthony Aalto Onto The HART Board

No prior board nominee in HART’s decade-long history received the same public scrutiny over qualifications and potential conflicts as Aalto did, reflecting a growing unease with the project.

For Cost Overruns, Honolulu Rail Is In A League Of Its Own, New Data Shows Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

For Cost Overruns, Honolulu Rail Is In A League Of Its Own, New Data Shows

A former FTA planning director says it’s time to pause and study the best path forward for the troubled transit project.

Paid To Stand By: How A Botched Rail Contract Multiplied Costs Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

Paid To Stand By: How A Botched Rail Contract Multiplied Costs

Rail contractors were paid to ramp up and be ready to perform utility relocation work that didn’t materialize.