Civil Beat Staff

Marcel Honore

Marcel Honore primarily covers rail for Civil Beat — and he’s always on the lookout for ways to describe the local transit project other than “cash-strapped,” “beleaguered” and “financially challenged” in his reports.

A native of Los Angeles, Marcel moved to Oahu in January 2013 and spent nearly five years covering transportation for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. He also served as the paper’s main correspondent covering the Hokule’a’s three-year worldwide voyage, sailing aboard the canoe on several of its international legs.

Prior to his Hawaii arrival, Marcel worked at the Palm Springs, California, Desert Sun, where he covered city government and immigration issues. His investigations into arsenic-tinged drinking water, foul odors emanating from a contaminated-soil facility and other environmental challenges affecting that region garnered several awards, including a 2011 California Newspaper Publishers Award.

Marcel started his journalism career as a graduate student at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, where he served as a Washington, D.C., correspondent for The Seattle Times and the Santa Barbara News-Press. While at Northwestern he also worked at the Associated Press’ Caracas, Venezuela, bureau covering policies under then-President Hugo Chavez.

Marcel should be a much better surfer than he currently is. He sincerely apologizes for dropping in on your wave.

State Supreme Court: Hawaii Longline Industry’s Use Of Foreign Crews OK Ronen Zilberman/Civil Beat

State Supreme Court: Hawaii Longline Industry’s Use Of Foreign Crews OK

Those crews’ working conditions have come under scrutiny in recent years because they don’t have legal standing in the U.S. and can’t leave the pier when docked.

With New Lawsuit, Advocates Prod Feds To Protect Hawaii Endangered Species DLNR

With New Lawsuit, Advocates Prod Feds To Protect Hawaii Endangered Species

The legal action applies to 49 species that were listed for federal protection in 2016.

Here’s What Climate Advocates Hope To See In Hawaii’s Next Governor Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

Here’s What Climate Advocates Hope To See In Hawaii’s Next Governor

The state needs to dramatically cut its carbon emissions in the next eight years to hit its climate goals. That will require bold leadership, advocates say.

Hey Oahu, Your Electric Bill Is About To Go Up Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2019

Hey Oahu, Your Electric Bill Is About To Go Up

Hawaiian Electric says the upcoming switch from coal to oil will increase the cost to consumers as the state moves to renewable energy.

Blangiardi: Concrete Cracking Could Push Honolulu Rail’s Opening To Next Year Nathan Eagle/Civil Beat/2022

Blangiardi: Concrete Cracking Could Push Honolulu Rail’s Opening To Next Year

Consultants and structural engineers are still assessing just how serious the cracking is in the piers that support several West Oahu stations.

Nearly 100,000 Pounds Of Nets, Other Debris Removed From Hawaii National Monument James Morioka/PMDP/2022

Nearly 100,000 Pounds Of Nets, Other Debris Removed From Hawaii National Monument

About 115,000 pounds of additional debris accumulate each year in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, researchers say.

TheBus Is Trying To Recover Riders Lost During The Pandemic. Why Not Cut Fares? Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2020

TheBus Is Trying To Recover Riders Lost During The Pandemic. Why Not Cut Fares?

A sustained fare cut isn’t part of a campaign next month to boost ridership. City transportation leaders say the move could hurt Oahu’s existing bus service.

HART: Cracking Could Require Building More Piers Under West Oahu Stations Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

HART: Cracking Could Require Building More Piers Under West Oahu Stations

The city and its consultants should release their findings on the potentially significant cracking problem in six to eight weeks.

Cracks In Concrete Columns Could Be Honolulu Rail’s Next Big Problem, HART Says Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

Cracks In Concrete Columns Could Be Honolulu Rail’s Next Big Problem, HART Says

City contractors have advised that no passengers be allowed on seven station platforms until they have a better grasp of the issue, rail officials said.