Civil Beat Staff

Marcel Honore

Marcel Honore primarily covers rail for Civil Beat — and he’s always on the lookout for ways to describe the local transit project other than “cash-strapped,” “beleaguered” and “financially challenged” in his reports.

A native of Los Angeles, Marcel moved to Oahu in January 2013 and spent nearly five years covering transportation for the Honolulu Star-Advertiser. He also served as the paper’s main correspondent covering the Hokule’a’s three-year worldwide voyage, sailing aboard the canoe on several of its international legs.

Prior to his Hawaii arrival, Marcel worked at the Palm Springs, California, Desert Sun, where he covered city government and immigration issues. His investigations into arsenic-tinged drinking water, foul odors emanating from a contaminated-soil facility and other environmental challenges affecting that region garnered several awards, including a 2011 California Newspaper Publishers Award.

Marcel started his journalism career as a graduate student at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, where he served as a Washington, D.C., correspondent for The Seattle Times and the Santa Barbara News-Press. While at Northwestern he also worked at the Associated Press’ Caracas, Venezuela, bureau covering policies under then-President Hugo Chavez.

Marcel should be a much better surfer than he currently is. He sincerely apologizes for dropping in on your wave.

HART Approves Rail’s Recovery Plan – Again Cory Lum/Civil Beat

HART Approves Rail’s Recovery Plan – Again

The move is intended to free up more than $700 million withheld by the project’s federal partners.

Analysis: Lane Could Have Destroyed Thousands of Aging Honolulu Homes Anthony Quintano/Civil Beat

Analysis: Lane Could Have Destroyed Thousands of Aging Honolulu Homes

A new estimate finds nearly 4,000 families would have been displaced, mostly those living in wooden-frame houses built before the stronger 1995 building regulations.

Voters Shooting Down HART Board Charter Amendment Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Voters Shooting Down HART Board Charter Amendment

The proposal would have made it easier for the board overseeing the Honolulu rail project to take action.

Honolulu To Take Out Short-Term Loan Of $44 Million To Keep Rail Going Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Honolulu To Take Out Short-Term Loan Of $44 Million To Keep Rail Going

This marks the first time that city property tax revenue will be used for the project.

Design Flaws May Delay Rail’s Interim Opening Set For 2020 Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Design Flaws May Delay Rail’s Interim Opening Set For 2020

Canopies planned for the project’s nine westernmost stations have “constructability issues,” said HART’s executive director.

Honolulu Taxpayers Now On The Hook To Help Build Rail Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Honolulu Taxpayers Now On The Hook To Help Build Rail

UPDATED: The City Council move may satisfy rail’s impatient federal partners, but it also reverses a pledge not to use city dollars for construction.

Will Voters Make It Easier For Honolulu Rail Board To Make Decisions? Hawaiian Electric Co.

Will Voters Make It Easier For Honolulu Rail Board To Make Decisions?

Legislators added nonvoting members for more project scrutiny, but the move made it harder for the board to reach a quorum.

Feds To City: Show Us The Rail Money Now Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Feds To City: Show Us The Rail Money Now

Honolulu will need to come up with $44 million by Nov. 20 — and a good-faith effort to eventually issue bonds for those dollars next year won’t cut it.

The ConCon’s Real Price Tag? That’s Still A Mystery Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The ConCon’s Real Price Tag? That’s Still A Mystery

An opposition ad puts the cost at $55 million. But that assumes unprecedented full public funding of campaigns for hundreds of delegate candidates.

City Taxpayers Move Closer To Covering Rail Costs After Council Vote Cory Lum/Civil Beat

City Taxpayers Move Closer To Covering Rail Costs After Council Vote

Backed in a corner, the Honolulu City Council took steps Wednesday to commit $44 million in bonds to help build the 20-mile rail system.

What Hawaii Can Learn From Puerto Rico’s Devastation Eduardo Meléndez/Civil Beat

What Hawaii Can Learn From Puerto Rico’s Devastation

The U.S. territory still hasn’t recovered from Maria. Hawaii officials hope better coordination and a more resilient electric grid will help avoid a similar fate.

More Frequent And More Frightening Storms On The Horizon

More Frequent And More Frightening Storms On The Horizon

Hawaii has been hit directly by a hurricane or tropical storm five times since 1950. Three of those direct hits came in the last four years.