The Hawaii Innocence Project is hosting a debate for Honolulu prosecutor candidates on Tuesday at the University of Hawaii Manoa.

Five attorneys vying for the prosecutor seat are expected to participate.

They are: former deputy prosecutor Megan Kau, public defender Jacquelyn Esser, former judge and U.S. Attorney Steve Alm, former deputy prosecutor RJ Brown and private criminal defense attorney Tae Kim.

Ken Lawson, the co-director of the Innocence Project, and Helen Yu, an assistant professor and the graduate chair of the public administration program, will moderate the debate.

A news release for the event said Acting Prosecutor Dwight Nadamoto, who registered with the state Campaign Spending Commission as a candidate, was invited, but declined to participate.

It said Nadamoto wrote back to Lawson, who invited him, and said he has not yet announced his intention to run and that he is still “exploring the possibility.”

The debate will take place at the Orvis Auditorium from 6:30 p.m. to 8:45 p.m. Seating is limited, so an RSVP is required for the free event.

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