The National Cancer Institute has increased its support of the University of Hawaii Cancer Center by raising its funding for the program’s research on cancer in Hawaii and the Pacific from $5.7 million to $8.4 million through July 2022.

In addition to cancer prevention and population-based research, the center provides access to clinical trials for Hawaii patients in collaboration with clinical partners.

“We are extremely pleased that the National Cancer Institute has recognized the incredible contributions that our investigators have made toward understanding the etiologies of cancer and toward the development of novel cancer prevention and treatment approaches,” said UH Cancer Center Director Randall Holcombe.

The UH Cancer Center has 69 full-time faculty members based at the center and at the John A. Burns School of Medicine, the Office of Public Health and the departments of Chemistry and Human Nutrition, Food and Animal Sciences at UH Manoa, and UH Hilo’s Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy.

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