Civil Beat Staff

Brittany Lyte

Brittany Lyte is a general assignment reporter for Civil Beat who specializes in watchdog reporting, narrative storytelling and coverage of neighbor island and social issues. Prior to joining the Honolulu newsroom in March 2018, Brittany lived on the north shore of Kaua’i, where she juggled a freelance writing career while learning to surf, scuba dive, hunt wild pigs, prepare delicious ulu pancakes and perfect the soursop cocktail. Her writing during this period appeared in publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Atlantic and Hana Hou! magazine. Previously, she worked for Hearst Newspapers in Connecticut. An Upstate New York native, she has a degree in journalism from Boston University.

In a decade of reporting, Brittany has traveled to Russia, Poland and across the U.S., interviewing subjects ranging from the Dalai Lama to Ghostface Killah of the Wu-Tang Clan. Her writing has explored a similarly vast range of topics, from the plight of an accused cannibal on the run from police to an investigation into undocumented toxic waste buried beneath suburban Connecticut homes. Her series on the latter subject earned national accolades and inspired the state legislature to adopt a new real estate disclosure law to better protect homebuyers.

In pursuit of a good story, Brittany has learned to fly an M-26 Air Wolf and chased down a suspected killer while wearing heels and a silk dress.

Kauai Finally Greenlights Retail Shops On Farmland LBD Coffee

Kauai Finally Greenlights Retail Shops On Farmland

The county amended its zoning rules last week to allow farmers to set up retail stores on agricultural land without a permit.

Kauai Police Chief Suspended For Mocking Asians Brittany Lyte/Civil Beat

Kauai Police Chief Suspended For Mocking Asians

Kauai County officials on Friday publicly disclosed for the first time details of the disciplinary action taken against Police Chief Todd Raybuck for violating a county discrimination policy.

How Scientists Are Pivoting In Their Quest To Save Hawaii’s Crows Courtesy: San Diego Zoo Wildlife Alliance

How Scientists Are Pivoting In Their Quest To Save Hawaii’s Crows

Conservationists are looking to Maui as a possible short-term solution for reestablishing alala in the wild.

Kauai Police Chief’s Rising Star Began To Fall Last Year, Job Reviews Show Brittany Lyte/Civil Beat

Kauai Police Chief’s Rising Star Began To Fall Last Year, Job Reviews Show

Kauai Police Chief Todd Raybuck spent the last two years building community goodwill and fixing problems within his department.

Kauai Councilwoman In The Hot Seat After Accepting Paid Trip To Russia Allan Parachini/Civil Beat

Kauai Councilwoman In The Hot Seat After Accepting Paid Trip To Russia

Kauai County Councilwoman Felicia Cowden says a Board of Ethics complaint against her is politically motivated.

How Addressing Hawaii’s Affordable Housing Crisis Could Help Farming Efforts Cory Lum/Civil Beat

How Addressing Hawaii’s Affordable Housing Crisis Could Help Farming Efforts

Farmers say housing insecurity threatens their ability to retain employees and makes it difficult to ramp up production.

Kauai Wants To Reopen Beaches. That Could Put Homeless Back On The Streets

Kauai Wants To Reopen Beaches. That Could Put Homeless Back On The Streets

The county’s shelter-in-place program granted some homeless people a measure of stability. Now that it’s over, they say they have nowhere to go.

Cocktails To Go? Hawaii Restaurants Hope Service Will Outlast The Pandemic Flickr: Rick

Cocktails To Go? Hawaii Restaurants Hope Service Will Outlast The Pandemic

The COVID-19 pandemic prompted dozens of states to allow bars and restaurants to sell to-go alcohol. Will Hawaii’s new liquor policy stick after the virus subsides?

Should Hawaii Invest To Help Workers Displaced By The Pandemic Find New Careers? Ronen Zilberman/Civil Beat

Should Hawaii Invest To Help Workers Displaced By The Pandemic Find New Careers?

Hawaii paid hundreds of unemployed tourism workers to learn new job skills last year. Now state lawmakers want to create a permanent jobs corps — but no one knows how to fund it.