Civil Beat Staff

Brittany Lyte

Brittany Lyte is a general assignment reporter for Civil Beat who specializes in watchdog reporting, narrative storytelling and coverage of neighbor island and social issues. Prior to joining the Honolulu newsroom in March 2018, Brittany lived on the north shore of Kaua’i, where she juggled a freelance writing career while learning to surf, scuba dive, hunt wild pigs, prepare delicious ulu pancakes and perfect the soursop cocktail. Her writing during this period appeared in publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Atlantic and Hana Hou! magazine. Previously, she worked for Hearst Newspapers in Connecticut. An Upstate New York native, she has a degree in journalism from Boston University.

In a decade of reporting, Brittany has traveled to Russia, Poland and across the U.S., interviewing subjects ranging from the Dalai Lama to Ghostface Killah of the Wu-Tang Clan. Her writing has explored a similarly vast range of topics, from the plight of an accused cannibal on the run from police to an investigation into undocumented toxic waste buried beneath suburban Connecticut homes. Her series on the latter subject earned national accolades and inspired the state legislature to adopt a new real estate disclosure law to better protect homebuyers.

In pursuit of a good story, Brittany has learned to fly an M-26 Air Wolf and chased down a suspected killer while wearing heels and a silk dress.

Hawaii’s Avocado Farmers Are Bracing For A New Threat Courtesy: Mike Lewis, Center for Invasive Species Research, UC Riverside/2021

Hawaii’s Avocado Farmers Are Bracing For A New Threat

The avocado lace bug has burst onto orchards, causing reduced yields, smaller fruit size and an increase in blemished fruit that can’t be sold.

Starwood Hits Brakes On Controversial Kauai Glamping Resort Allan Parachini/Civil Beat/2020

Starwood Hits Brakes On Controversial Kauai Glamping Resort

The hotel developer said it plans to withdraw its county permit application to transform three holes of golf into a luxury glamping resort.

Maui To Stop Processing Immigration Applications Ludwig Laab/Civil Beat/2021

Maui To Stop Processing Immigration Applications

The county said it will no longer prepare and review immigration applications and other documents for Maui residents following the retirements of federally accredited staff.

Hawaii’s Food Hubs Get $1 Million For Statewide Expansion Flickr.com: Brock Rosberry

Hawaii’s Food Hubs Get $1 Million For Statewide Expansion

A collective of statewide food hubs has a plan to get more crops from small farmers to businesses, institutions and families that want locally grown food.

How A Maui Solar Farm Reached An ‘Unprecedented’ Deal With Neighbors Doug Murray/FPL

How A Maui Solar Farm Reached An ‘Unprecedented’ Deal With Neighbors

Advocates say the agreement between a renewable energy company and a community group in West Maui could be a model for resolving disputes.

Can Hawaii Agriculture Get Back Its Political Clout? Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2019

Can Hawaii Agriculture Get Back Its Political Clout?

The plantations that were so profitable in their heyday had the support of generous government incentives. Experts say today’s farmers must build political muscle to win state support.

Kauai Homeowners Worry About ‘Black Slime’ Health Risks Brittany Lyte/Civil Beat/2021

Kauai Homeowners Worry About ‘Black Slime’ Health Risks

Residents say they feel trapped in new homes plagued by a mysterious water problem that they fear could be making them sick.

Former Kauai Councilman Pleads Guilty To Leading Meth Ring Kauai County

Former Kauai Councilman Pleads Guilty To Leading Meth Ring

Brun changed his plea as part of an agreement with prosecutors. A judge must approve the deal for it to move forward.

Feds Say Hawaiian Hoary Bats Aren’t Endangered Despite Unresolved Questions Flickr: Forest and Kim Starr

Feds Say Hawaiian Hoary Bats Aren’t Endangered Despite Unresolved Questions

Wind farm developers are funding millions of dollars of research that’s helping scientists better understand Hawaii’s imperiled bats.