If you’re a Honolulu voter who hasn’t received their primary election ballot as of Monday, the city urges you to request a replacement ballot.

You can request one online or by calling the Honolulu Elections Division at (808) 768-3800 Monday through Friday 7:45 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Michael B Fisher, 54-128 Kawaipuna Street. 4 of 4 ballots that arrived there and the person does not live there now.
Ballots need to be received by 7 p.m. on Saturday to be counted. Cory Lum/Civil Beat

The last batch of replacement ballots will be mailed on Tuesday afternoon, said Honolulu Elections Administrator Rex Quidilla.

If a voter doesn’t request one in time, they can still vote in-person at a Voter Service Center, which will be open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and on Saturday –  Primary Election Day – from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.

If possible, voters shouldn’t wait until Saturday to vote in person, Quidilla said. He advises going during the week to avoid crowding.

Voters who receive their ballot after Monday should put it in a designated deposit box or drop it off at a Voter Service Center to ensure it is counted. Ballots that are received by mail after 7 p.m. on Saturday will not be counted. It needs to be received by that time, not just postmarked.

Over 450,000 ballots were sent out islandwide at the end of July, so some delivery issues are to be expected, Quidilla said. The city has already received about 7,000 bounce-back ballots from addresses where voters no longer live, he said.

Honolulu has gotten 209 calls so far from voters who haven’t received ballots yet, Quidilla said. Another 843 people called the office to request a replacement ballot for various reasons, including making an error.

As of Saturday, Honolulu had received 142,625 ballots, according to the elections division.

 

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