There are six bills that have been introduced in the House relating to marijuana. There are eight bills under consideration in the Senate.

Six of the bills deal with medical marijuana. Six deal with easing restrictions on marijuana use and possession. Two bills propose to amend Hawaii’s Revised Statutes to bring state law in line with federal law regarding marijuana.

Medical Marijuana

1) House Bill 923

What it does: Creates three classes of medical marijuana licenses: class 1 medical marijuana compassion center license for the sale of medical marijuana to qualified patients; class 2 medical marijuana cultivation license; class 3 medical marijuana-infused products manufacturing license. Specifies requirements for each class. Makes medical marijuana sales subject to income and excise taxes. Establishes a special marijuana sales tax on sales of medical marijuana. Establishes a fee for issuance and renewal of a license and a special marijuana sales tax.

The latest: Referred to three committees Jan. 26: A joint committee with the Health committee and the Public Safety and Military Affairs committee; the Judiciary committee; and the Finance committee. Awaiting a hearing.

2) House Bill 1169

What it does: Clarifies the state’s medical use of marijuana law. Increases penalties for fraudulent application to make consistent with penalties for other controlled substances.

The latest: Referred to three committees Jan. 26: A joint committee with the Health committee and the Public Safety and Military Affairs committee; the Judiciary committee; and the Finance committee. Awaiting a hearing.

3) House Bill 1624

What it does: Establishes a 3-year pilot medical marijuana research program in the State to provide a means by which a team of qualified researchers could undertake medical marijuana research involving local qualifying medical marijuana patients. Effective 7/1/11. Sunset 6/30/14.

The latest: Referred to three committees on Jan. 28: the Public Safety and Military Affairs committee; the Health committee; and the Finance Committee. Awaiting a hearing.

4) Senate Bill 175

What it does: Transfers jurisdiction over the medical marijuana laws from the department of public safety to the department of health.

The latest: There joint committee hearing by the Public Safety, Government Operations, and Military Affairs and the Health committee for Feb. 8 at 2:45 p.m. in conference room 224.

5) Senate Bill 1458

What it does: Creates three classes of medical marijuana licenses: class 1 medical marijuana compassion center license for the sale of medical marijuana to qualified patients; class 2 medical marijuana cultivation license; class 3 medical marijuana-infused products manufacturing license. Specifies requirements for each class. Makes medical marijuana sales subject to income and excise taxes. Establishes a special marijuana sales tax on sales of medical marijuana. Establishes a fee for issuance and renewal of a license and a special marijuana sales tax.

The latest: A joint committee on Health and Public Safety, Government Operations, and Military Affairs has scheduled a public hearing Feb. 4 at 3:45 p.m. in conference room 229.

6) Senate Bill 1459

What it does: Establishes licensure of producers, processors, and dispensers of medical marijuana. Requires secure registration system. Reserves authority to regulate medical use of marijuana to the State. Directs the auditor to conduct a cost-benefit evaluation.

The latest: Referred to two committees Jan. 28: the joint committee on Health and Judiciary and Labor; and the Ways and Means Committee. Awaiting a hearing.

Easing Restrictions

1) House Bill 142

What it does: Directs the attorney general to coordinate a review of the impact of diverting marijuana and certain felony drug offenders out of the criminal justice system into treatment.

The latest: The bill is scheduled to be heard by the Public Safety and Military Affairs committee Thursday, Feb. 3, at 8:30 a.m. in conference room 309.

2) House Bill 544

What it does: Reclassifies possession of less than one ounce of marijuana from a petty misdemeanor to a violation.

The latest: Referred to the Judiciary committee on Jan. 24. Awaiting a hearing.

3) Senate Bill 174

What it does: Removes marijuana and tetrahydrocannabinols from the schedule I controlled substances list and places them in the schedule III controlled substances list.

The latest: The committee on Health recommended that the measure be PASSED, WITH AMENDMENTS. The votes in the Health committee were as follows: 3 Aye(s): Senator(s) Baker; Aye(s) with reservations: Senator(s) Green, Nishihara ; 1 No(es): Senator(s) Chun Oakland; and 3 Excused: Senator(s) Shimabukuro, Wakai, Slom.

4) Senate Bill 252

What it does: Directs the attorney general to coordinate a review of the impact of diverting marijuana and certain felony drug offenders out of the criminal justice system into treatment.

The latest: The Public Safety, Government Operations, and Military Affairs committee has scheduled a public hearing for Feb. 8 at 3:15 p.m. in conference room 224.

5) Senate Bill 702

What it does: Directs the attorney general to coordinate a review of the impact of diverting marijuana and low-level felony drug offenders out of the criminal justice system and into treatment.

The latest: Referred to the Judiciary and Labor committee. Awaiting a hearing.

6) Senate Bill 1460

What it does: Establishes a civil violation for possession of one ounce or less of marijuana that is subject to a fine of not more than $100. Deletes reporting requirements of board of education for students possessing one ounce or less of marijuana. Clarifies that medical marijuana patients and primary caregiver may assert affirmative defense to prosecution, criminal or civil, involving possession of one ounce or less of marijuana. Excludes possession of more than one ounce of marijuana from authority of Hawaii paroling authority to require paroled prisoner to undergo and complete substance abuse treatment. Excludes possession of more than one ounce of marijuana from authority of courts to require a defendant to undergo and complete substance abuse treatment for probation violation. Clarifies definition of detrimental drug to exclude one ounce or less of marijuana. Excludes possession of one ounce or less of marijuana from offenses of promoting a detrimental drug in the second degree and third degree. Clarifies that possession of one ounce or less of marijuana does not constitute a possession with intent to distribute without other conduct indicating an intent to distribute for purposes of promoting controlled substance in or near schools, school vehicles, or public parks. Clarifies a civil violation for possession of marijuana does not constitute a prior offense for purposes of the conditional discharge law.

The latest: The joint committee on Judiciary and Labor and the Health committee has scheduled a public hearing on Feb 4 at 3:00 p.m. in conference room 229.

Statutes

1) House Bill 1085

What it does: This measure amends chapter 329, Hawaii Revised Statutes, to bring the Hawaii statutes on controlled substances to be consistent with the federal laws on controlled substances, and increases the fee for the registration certificate for qualifying patients for medical marijuana.

The latest: Bill scheduled to be heard by Public Safety and Military Affairs committee on Thursday, Feb. 3 at 8:30 a.m. in conference room 309.

2) Senate Bill 1305

What it does: This measure amends chapter 329, Hawaii Revised Statutes, to bring the Hawaii statutes on controlled substances to be consistent with the federal laws on controlled substances, and increases the fee for the registration certificate for qualifying patients for medical marijuana.

The latest: Referred to two committees: The Judiciary and Labor committee and the Ways and Means committee. Awaiting a hearing.