The Democratic Party of Hawaii will hold its presidential preference poll Saturday afternoon.

The Democratic candidates are Hillary Clinton, the former secretary of state; Bernie Sanders, the senator from Vermont, and businessman Roque De La Fuente. Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley is also on the secret ballot.

Polls open at 1 p.m., and all precinct meeting locations and registration times are listed here.

You can also email to info@hawaiidemocrats.org to request more information.

Democrat Party logo

“This is an exciting opportunity for Hawaii to have a real say in selecting the next President of the United States,” Party Chair Stephanie Ohigashi said in a statement. “We are expecting a great turnout, so we encourage all Democratic Party members and those who wish to join the party to arrive early to register.”

It’s clear that the leading candidates feel Hawaii matters.

The senator’s wife, Jane Sanders, campaigned in the state Sunday and Monday, and the Clinton campaign is promoting hundreds of prominent local supporters. Both camps are airing political ads.

Voters are advised to bring identification, and be prepared to register as Democrats.

Hawaii has 34 Democratic delegates to this summer’s national convention. Democratic caucuses are also scheduled Saturday in Washington state (118 delegates) and Alaska (20 delegates).

Local Democrats are also using Saturday to hold their biennial precinct meetings.

It’s not clear what time election results will be available.

But Ohigashi, who is from Maui and will be coming to Oahu for the occasion, said she’s bringing goodies from Krispy Kreme in Kahului to help heal the wounds of supporters of losing candidates.

“The most beautiful thing about the Democratic Party is that I can already see us coming together after the vote,” she said. “We gotta win in November.”

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