Endangered Hawaiian petrels now have a predator-proof place to live on Kauai.

Teams of workers from government and nonprofit agencies took 10 downy chicks by helicopter from their mountainous nesting area to a newly fenced-in area at Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge, according to a news release Tuesday from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

“Petrels, like many other native Hawaiian species, are facing tremendous challenges with shrinking habitat and the onslaught of invasive species,” said Michael Mitchell of the FWS.

After being dropped by helicopter on to the mountain, the translocation teams headed for nest burrows that had been monitored throughout the breeding season. Each burrow contained a large, healthy chick.

After being dropped by helicopter on to the mountain, the translocation teams headed for nest burrows that had been monitored throughout the breeding season. Each burrow contained a large, healthy chick.

Andre Raine/Kauai Endangered Seabird Recovery Project

Hawaiian petrels are one of two species of seabirds endemic to the Hawaiian Islands that are found nowhere else on earth.

“Predator‐proof fencing and translocations of this type are necessary conservation strategies in Hawaii to deal with widespread non‐native predator populations that cannot be readily eradicated,” said George Wallace, vice president of American Bird Conservancy.

Read more about the agencies that were involved and the project here.

The Hawaiian petrel chicks were tucked into their new nests at Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge.

The Hawaiian petrel chicks were tucked into their new nests at Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge.

Ann Bell/USFWS

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