Civil Beat Staff

Jessica Terrell

Jessica Terrell is Civil Beat’s podcast and multimedia editor.

Jessica joined Civil Beat in 2015, after reporting stints at the Orange County Register in California and Tribeca Trib in New York City. 

As a reporter, Jessica has investigated everything from school safety concerns to faulty public works projects and military recruitment irregularities. She’s covered two national political conventions, and filed stories from the White House during President Barack Obama’s first summer in office as an intern at the Orange County Register.

Other memorable reporting assignments include camping out overnight in Manhattan’s Zuccotti Park for a story on Occupy Wall Street, visiting the National Sept. 11 Memorial before it opened with members of Manhattan’s Community Board 1, and climbing 36 flights of stairs in the dark after Hurricane Sandy to find her editor and start reporting on the impacts of the storm in lower Manhattan.

Born in Mexico, Jessica spent much of her childhood traveling around North America. She wrote her first newspaper article at the age of 12 for a small paper in Massachusetts, where her family was living aboard a 50-foot raft built out of materials collected from New York City dumpsters.

When her family wasn’t building rafts, they were performing together in circuses and busking on the streets as a family jazz band. Spending her early years wandering from town to town imbued her with a passion for discovery that she tries to translate into work as a journalist.

Karaoke Bar Penalized For Violating Emergency Order Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Karaoke Bar Penalized For Violating Emergency Order

Bars in Honolulu have to stop serving liquor at midnight, according to emergency rules aimed at stemming the spread of COVID-19.

Stories Of Pain And Success From The Hawaiian Diaspora Kuʻu Kauanoe/Civil Beat

Stories Of Pain And Success From The Hawaiian Diaspora

A few months ago we asked Native Hawaiian readers outside of Hawaii to tell us why they left the islands. Here’s what they had to say.

How Las Vegas Became Hawaii’s 9th Island Kuʻu Kauanoe/Civil Beat

How Las Vegas Became Hawaii’s 9th Island

Hawaiians started moving to Las Vegas in the 1970s, and the community there continues to grow.

The Forgotten Story Of How Hawaiians Transformed American Music Courtesy: AlyssaBeth Archambault and Family

The Forgotten Story Of How Hawaiians Transformed American Music

Hawaiian musicians touring across America in the 1900s had an enormous — and often overlooked — impact on the development of blues and country music.

The Surprising History Of Hawaiians In The Civil War Joel Abroad / Creative Commons

The Surprising History Of Hawaiians In The Civil War

More than 100 Native Hawaiians fought in America’s bloodiest war. Finding out what happened to them is a near-impossible task.

Tracing California’s ‘Lost Tribe’ Of Hawaiians Jessica Terrell/Civil Beat

Tracing California’s ‘Lost Tribe’ Of Hawaiians

A group of Native Hawaiians traveled to California 181 years ago. Their descendants are still connected to the islands in surprising ways.

What Does It Mean To Be Hawaiian Outside Of Hawaii? Kuʻu Kauanoe/Civil Beat

What Does It Mean To Be Hawaiian Outside Of Hawaii?

Nearly half of all Native Hawaiians live outside Hawaii. But, as we discover in the new season of Offshore, Hawaiians carry the islands with them to far-flung places.

Our New Audio Reporter Brings Her Passion For The Environment To Hawaii

Our New Audio Reporter Brings Her Passion For The Environment To Hawaii

Claire Caulfield will tackle reader questions about the environment for Civil Beat’s newest podcast.