Civil Beat Staff

Lauren Teruya

Lauren Teruya is a reporting fellow for Honolulu Civil Beat. She is one of  53 Poynter-Koch Fellows across the country.

Prior to joining the newsroom in July 2021, Lauren wrote and produced stories for the Hawaii News Now noon show, “This is Now.”

Lauren grew up in Honolulu, attending Iolani School for 13 years. She graduated with honors in 2021 from the University of Southern California with her bachelor’s degree in journalism and theatre and master’s degree in specialized journalism.

During her final year in college, she interned with the legal team at BuzzFeed News, investigating the damage and theft that occurred during the insurrection at the Capitol. Other publications she’s written for include L.A. Taco, Jackson Hole News & Guide and Dishing Magazine.

When she’s not working, Lauren is most likely exploring the outdoors or rehearsing for a show at Diamond Head Theatre. You can contact her at lteruya@civilbeat.org.

Judge Allows Case Against HPD Officers In Sykap Shooting To Move Forward Ronen Zilberman/Civil Beat/2021

Judge Allows Case Against HPD Officers In Sykap Shooting To Move Forward

Attorneys for the three officers argued that the case should be dismissed because a grand jury declined to indict them.

Getting Rental And Utility Relief On Oahu Can Be Harder Than It Seems Getty Images/iStockphoto

Getting Rental And Utility Relief On Oahu Can Be Harder Than It Seems

Tenants are frustrated and fearful as they try to navigate economic aid programs before the eviction moratorium is lifted.

Honolulu Mayor Vows To ‘Play Tough’ On Crime In Chinatown Lauren Teruya/Civil Beat /2021

Honolulu Mayor Vows To ‘Play Tough’ On Crime In Chinatown

Mayor Rick Blangiardi and Prosecuting Attorney Steve Alm headlined a fundraiser to bolster the Weed and Seed program.

Lawsuit: State Board Fails To Protect West Hawaii From Aquarium Trade Nathan Eagle/Civil Beat

Lawsuit: State Board Fails To Protect West Hawaii From Aquarium Trade

Groups are challenging the Board of Land and Natural Resources’ decision to accept the latest environmental review of the area’s capability to allow the collection of aquatic life.