Civil Beat Staff

Stewart Yerton

Stewart Yerton reports on business and the economy for Honolulu Civil Beat. Those are subjects he spent more than a decade reporting on — at publications in New York, New Orleans and Honolulu.

He’s written about the U.S. treasury bond market, the business of big law firms, controversies surrounding the world’s largest gold mine on the island of New Guinea and corruption in the Louisiana casino industry. His reporting on the human cadaver trade, published in The Times-Picayune newspaper, won the Society of American Business Editors & Writers 2005 Best in Business Award for Enterprise Reporting in the large newspaper category.

Stewart’s first big newspaper story, for The Birmingham (Ala.) News, was about a political battle between a small-town mayor and the volunteer firefighters who were trying to oust him from office because of the mayor’s 30-year-old conviction for making moonshine whiskey. The story briefly thrust the tiny town of Brookside, Ala., into the national spotlight when The Washington Post came to write about the comic-gothic brouhaha.

A member of the Hawaii State Bar Association since January 2012, Stewart graduated cum laude from University of Hawaii’s William S. Richardson School of Law, where he earned the environmental law certificate. His paper “Procedural Standing and the Hawaii Superferry Decision: How a Surfer, a Paddler, and an Orchid Farmer Aligned Hawaii’s Standing Doctrine with Federal Principles” was published in the Asian Pacific Law & Policy Journal in 2011. In law school, Stewart externed for U.S. District Court Judge David Alan Ezra and served as the law school’s first Jarman Environmental Law Fellow. Stewart also has worked as an analyst with the Hawaii State Auditor’s office.

When not working, Stewart can often be found practicing yoga and Argentine tango, attempting to play guitar, and chauffeuring his two daughters around Oahu.

Hawaii’s Affordable Housing Law Sparks Battles At The Capitol Ku‘u Kauanoe/Civil Beat/2023

Hawaii’s Affordable Housing Law Sparks Battles At The Capitol

At a time when housing is a priority for the island state, some lawmakers are pushing back against a law that eases development.

Honolulu Homeowners Are Shocked At New Property Tax Bills. Here’s Something That Could Help Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

Honolulu Homeowners Are Shocked At New Property Tax Bills. Here’s Something That Could Help

Several states have so-called "Truth-in-Taxation" laws designed to mitigate the sharp property tax increases like the ones Honolulu homeowners are facing.

Nonprofit And Business Leaders Find Hope In Governor’s Affordability Plan David Croxford/Civil Beat/2023

Nonprofit And Business Leaders Find Hope In Governor’s Affordability Plan

Dubbed the Green Affordability Plan, Gov. Josh Green's proposal would provide more than $300 million annually to struggling households.

Proposed $1 Billion Hydrogen Fuel Hub Signals A New Start For Reenergized Hawaii Agency Getty Images/iStockphoto

Proposed $1 Billion Hydrogen Fuel Hub Signals A New Start For Reenergized Hawaii Agency

The state Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism floundered under the Ige administration.
Federal Judge Grants Broad Order Protecting A Honolulu Reporter Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

Federal Judge Grants Broad Order Protecting A Honolulu Reporter

The ruling means Hawaii News Now reporter Lynn Kawano cannot be forced to cooperate with Maui County for reporting on a former Maui County police officer.
Renewable Energy Projects Are Back On Track After Pandemic Lull Nathan Eagle/Civil Beat/2023

Renewable Energy Projects Are Back On Track After Pandemic Lull

Supply chain challenges are easing, allowing Hawaii utilities to step up efforts to go green by 2045.
Hawaii Hospital Giant Reaches Tentative Deal With Nurses Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2020

Hawaii Hospital Giant Reaches Tentative Deal With Nurses

Nurses at Hawaii Pacific Health's Straub Medical Center have until Friday to accept or reject a proposed union contract.
Investigative Reporter May Have To Testify Despite Journalist Privilege Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

Investigative Reporter May Have To Testify Despite Journalist Privilege

A federal judge said Hawaii News Now's Lynn Kawano did not waive her privilege when reporting about a Maui police officer accused of sexual misconduct.