Civil Beat Staff

Stewart Yerton

Stewart Yerton reports on business and the economy for Honolulu Civil Beat. Those are subjects he spent more than a decade reporting on — at publications in New York, New Orleans and Honolulu.

He’s written about the U.S. treasury bond market, the business of big law firms, controversies surrounding the world’s largest gold mine on the island of New Guinea and corruption in the Louisiana casino industry. His reporting on the human cadaver trade, published in The Times-Picayune newspaper, won the Society of American Business Editors & Writers 2005 Best in Business Award for Enterprise Reporting in the large newspaper category.

Stewart’s first big newspaper story, for The Birmingham (Ala.) News, was about a political battle between a small-town mayor and the volunteer firefighters who were trying to oust him from office because of the mayor’s 30-year-old conviction for making moonshine whiskey. The story briefly thrust the tiny town of Brookside, Ala., into the national spotlight when The Washington Post came to write about the comic-gothic brouhaha.

A member of the Hawaii State Bar Association since January 2012, Stewart graduated cum laude from University of Hawaii’s William S. Richardson School of Law, where he earned the environmental law certificate. His paper “Procedural Standing and the Hawaii Superferry Decision: How a Surfer, a Paddler, and an Orchid Farmer Aligned Hawaii’s Standing Doctrine with Federal Principles” was published in the Asian Pacific Law & Policy Journal in 2011. In law school, Stewart externed for U.S. District Court Judge David Alan Ezra and served as the law school’s first Jarman Environmental Law Fellow. Stewart also has worked as an analyst with the Hawaii State Auditor’s office.

When not working, Stewart can often be found practicing yoga and Argentine tango, attempting to play guitar, and chauffeuring his two daughters around Oahu.

Judge Says Lawsuit Against Department Of Agriculture Can Go Forward Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat/2022

Judge Says Lawsuit Against Department Of Agriculture Can Go Forward

Hooah Farms has been called a model for Oahu, but the owners want out of the Kahuku Agricultural Park, saying the park’s manager can’t be trusted.

Supreme Court Orders Judge To Revisit Sealed Case Dispute Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

Supreme Court Orders Judge To Revisit Sealed Case Dispute

The Civil Beat Law Center for the Public Interest has asked Circuit Court Judge Gary Chang to unseal names of defendants in a case, restore a complaint the judge removed and lift a gag order imposed on the center.

Lower Electric Bills Or More Jobs? Hawaii Grapples With A Green Economy Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

Lower Electric Bills Or More Jobs? Hawaii Grapples With A Green Economy

Lawmakers did an abrupt — and secretive — about-face as the session ended when they revamped a bill putting limits on some renewable energy sources.

How Fast Can Government Agencies Turn The Legislature’s $1 Billion Into New Housing? Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

How Fast Can Government Agencies Turn The Legislature’s $1 Billion Into New Housing?

Lawmakers just appropriated approximately $1 billion to help build homes for residents. Now it’s up to the executive branch to make things happen.

A Mysterious Lawsuit Is Raising Concerns Over The Public’s Right To See Court Records Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

A Mysterious Lawsuit Is Raising Concerns Over The Public’s Right To See Court Records

Among other weird legal twists, the judge in the case slapped a gag order on the attorney trying to get the records unsealed.

How Honolulu’s Push For More Housing Sparks Opposition From Rival Interests Cassie Ordonio/Civil Beat/2022

How Honolulu’s Push For More Housing Sparks Opposition From Rival Interests

Housing is an abstract goal, but the concrete reality usually sparks opposition from advocates for farmland or the environment or those simply worried about urban woes.

Hawaiian Airlines Is Taking Off As Travel Restrictions Ease Ludwig Laab/Civil Beat/2021

Hawaiian Airlines Is Taking Off As Travel Restrictions Ease

After bleeding more than $4 million per day during the pandemic, the state’s dominant air carrier and linchpin of the tourism industry forecast a positive cash flow by summer.

Oahu Nonprofits To Get $4.5M To Address Housing And Financial Woes Ronen Zilberman/Civil Beat/2020

Oahu Nonprofits To Get $4.5M To Address Housing And Financial Woes

The 17 organizations will work together to help solve critical problems facing the island’s working families.

Hawaii Tourism Plan Focuses On Marketing, Not Management Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2022

Hawaii Tourism Plan Focuses On Marketing, Not Management

The Hawaii Tourism Authority’s $35 million tourism marketing and management contract will guide how the state presents itself to U.S. travelers.