Civil Beat Staff

Stewart Yerton

Stewart Yerton reports on business and the economy for Honolulu Civil Beat. Those are subjects he spent more than a decade reporting on — at publications in New York, New Orleans and Honolulu.

He’s written about the U.S. treasury bond market, the business of big law firms, controversies surrounding the world’s largest gold mine on the island of New Guinea and corruption in the Louisiana casino industry. His reporting on the human cadaver trade, published in The Times-Picayune newspaper, won the Society of American Business Editors & Writers 2005 Best in Business Award for Enterprise Reporting in the large newspaper category.

Stewart’s first big newspaper story, for The Birmingham (Ala.) News, was about a political battle between a small-town mayor and the volunteer firefighters who were trying to oust him from office because of the mayor’s 30-year-old conviction for making moonshine whiskey. The story briefly thrust the tiny town of Brookside, Ala., into the national spotlight when The Washington Post came to write about the comic-gothic brouhaha.

A member of the Hawaii State Bar Association since January 2012, Stewart graduated cum laude from University of Hawaii’s William S. Richardson School of Law, where he earned the environmental law certificate. His paper “Procedural Standing and the Hawaii Superferry Decision: How a Surfer, a Paddler, and an Orchid Farmer Aligned Hawaii’s Standing Doctrine with Federal Principles” was published in the Asian Pacific Law & Policy Journal in 2011. In law school, Stewart externed for U.S. District Court Judge David Alan Ezra and served as the law school’s first Jarman Environmental Law Fellow. Stewart also has worked as an analyst with the Hawaii State Auditor’s office.

When not working, Stewart can often be found practicing yoga and Argentine tango, attempting to play guitar, and chauffeuring his two daughters around Oahu.

50 Years Later, Hawaii’s Law Requiring Professional Licenses Could Be In For An Overhaul Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat /2021

50 Years Later, Hawaii’s Law Requiring Professional Licenses Could Be In For An Overhaul

The occupational licensing requirements for many professions may be hindering qualified professionals from moving to Hawaii and getting work.

Vacation Rental Bill Could Starve Windward Businesses That Cater To Tourists Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat /2021

Vacation Rental Bill Could Starve Windward Businesses That Cater To Tourists

Already suffering from Covid-19’s blow to tourism and the continuing shutdown of travel from Japan, small businesses in Kailua are bracing for the impact of a bill to crack down on illegal short-term rentals.

Report: Hotels Used Large Amounts Of Power And Water During Shutdown Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Report: Hotels Used Large Amounts Of Power And Water During Shutdown

Even with relatively few guests, hotels used 8.7% of the electricity consumed on Oahu in 2020.

Hawaii Sues State’s Largest Oil Refiner For Alleged Unpaid Taxes Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat/2021

Hawaii Sues State’s Largest Oil Refiner For Alleged Unpaid Taxes

The whistleblower suit against Par Hawaii could have repercussions for other companies operating in Hawaii’s foreign trade zones.

How Long Can Gov. Ige Keep Invoking His Emergency Powers? Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

How Long Can Gov. Ige Keep Invoking His Emergency Powers?

As it stands, Hawaii’s Covid-19 state of emergency officially ends on Nov. 30, but it won’t really be over until Gov. David Ige says it is.

Kewalo Basin Harbor Mud Discharge Likely Violated Law, Health Official Says Hawaii Department of Health, Clean Water Branch

Kewalo Basin Harbor Mud Discharge Likely Violated Law, Health Official Says

Harbor tenants have blamed the developer Howard Hughes Corp.’s construction site for the problems, but officials say the source is unknown.

Kewalo Boat Owners Say Howard Hughes Project Is Raining Dust And Dirt Cory Lum/Civil Beat/2021

Kewalo Boat Owners Say Howard Hughes Project Is Raining Dust And Dirt

Though there’s no proof the construction project is the culprit, Howard Hughes isn’t required to say how much it’s releasing into storm drains.

Ka Hoʻopakele ʻAna I Ko Hawaiʻi ʻOihana Mahi Maiʻa ‘He Hoʻokahi Maiʻa’ O Ka Manawa Pākahi Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat /2021

Ka Hoʻopakele ʻAna I Ko Hawaiʻi ʻOihana Mahi Maiʻa ‘He Hoʻokahi Maiʻa’ O Ka Manawa Pākahi

Ke Hoʻoikaika Nei ʻo Gabriel Sachter-Smith i ka ʻimi aku a loaʻa ka maiʻa kīnā ʻole pono loa na Hawaiʻi. He 200 haneli nā mana maiʻa e hoʻomākaukau ʻia nei. 

Despite Momentum, Hawaiian Airlines Forecast Signals Slow Recovery Ludwig Laab/Civil Beat/2021

Despite Momentum, Hawaiian Airlines Forecast Signals Slow Recovery

Hawaiian Airlines plans to restart flights to Australia in time for the holidays but still expects revenue to be considerably lower than before the pandemic.