Civil Beat Staff

Stewart Yerton

Stewart Yerton reports on business and the economy for Honolulu Civil Beat. Those are subjects he spent more than a decade reporting on — at publications in New York, New Orleans and Honolulu.

He’s written about the U.S. treasury bond market, the business of big law firms, controversies surrounding the world’s largest gold mine on the island of New Guinea and corruption in the Louisiana casino industry. His reporting on the human cadaver trade, published in The Times-Picayune newspaper, won the Society of American Business Editors & Writers 2005 Best in Business Award for Enterprise Reporting in the large newspaper category.

Stewart’s first big newspaper story, for The Birmingham (Ala.) News, was about a political battle between a small-town mayor and the volunteer firefighters who were trying to oust him from office because of the mayor’s 30-year-old conviction for making moonshine whiskey. The story briefly thrust the tiny town of Brookside, Ala., into the national spotlight when The Washington Post came to write about the comic-gothic brouhaha.

A member of the Hawaii State Bar Association since January 2012, Stewart graduated cum laude from University of Hawaii’s William S. Richardson School of Law, where he earned the environmental law certificate. His paper “Procedural Standing and the Hawaii Superferry Decision: How a Surfer, a Paddler, and an Orchid Farmer Aligned Hawaii’s Standing Doctrine with Federal Principles” was published in the Asian Pacific Law & Policy Journal in 2011. In law school, Stewart externed for U.S. District Court Judge David Alan Ezra and served as the law school’s first Jarman Environmental Law Fellow. Stewart also has worked as an analyst with the Hawaii State Auditor’s office.

When not working, Stewart can often be found practicing yoga and Argentine tango, attempting to play guitar, and chauffeuring his two daughters around Oahu.

Second Bid To Impeach Honolulu’s Top Prosecutor Is Filed Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Second Bid To Impeach Honolulu’s Top Prosecutor Is Filed

A Honolulu businessman once charged with operating an illegal gambling operation is seeking to remove Keith Kaneshiro, the Honolulu prosecutor.

Honolulu Prosecutor Objects To Feds’ Ruling On A Third Deedy Trial PF Bentley/Civil Beat

Honolulu Prosecutor Objects To Feds’ Ruling On A Third Deedy Trial

A U.S. Court of Appeals panel ruled Christopher Deedy couldn’t be tried for manslaughter charges again, but only on assault charges.

Regulators Demand Audit Of Hawaiian Electric Co. Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Regulators Demand Audit Of Hawaiian Electric Co.

The PUC says the investigation will promote more transparency and understanding about HECO’s management practices.

Hawaii Gas Faces Uncertain Future In State’s Renewable Energy Push Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii Gas Faces Uncertain Future In State’s Renewable Energy Push

A bill to limit the use of natural gas in new homes could be a first step to broader bans, a gas company official says.

Airbnb Crackdown Does Not Deter Oahu Visitors Screenshot

Airbnb Crackdown Does Not Deter Oahu Visitors

More visitors came to Hawaii in September, but visitor spending dropped.

PUC’s Former Lawyer Says Approval Of Kahuku Wind Farm Violated Law Cory Lum/Civil Beat

PUC’s Former Lawyer Says Approval Of Kahuku Wind Farm Violated Law

A former Public Utilities Commission counsel said regulators needed to complete an environmental review before approving the controversial project.

Conflicts, Antitrust Questions Raised Regarding Maui Solar Farm Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Conflicts, Antitrust Questions Raised Regarding Maui Solar Farm

Utilities and others are concerned that the same lawyers are representing multiple parties in a competitive bidding process.

Hawaii’s Green Energy Projects Search For Ways To Navigate Community Opposition Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Hawaii’s Green Energy Projects Search For Ways To Navigate Community Opposition

A number of new solar and wind projects are needed on Oahu to replace the last coal-fired plant, which is scheduled to close in 2022.

Why Hawaii Still Has So Few Electric Cars Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Why Hawaii Still Has So Few Electric Cars

Only about 1% of cars here are electric vehicles. Advocates say boosting that number requires mandating builders install charging stations at new developments.

Who Climbs Koko Crater? An Avid Hiker Wants To Find Out Courtesy of Jane Howard

Who Climbs Koko Crater? An Avid Hiker Wants To Find Out

A University of Hawaii public policy professor conducted a private study that he hopes will help city officials better manage one of Oahu’s most popular — and overrun — hiking trails.

Hawaii Coffee Farmers: State Policy Is Putting Crops At Risk Stewart Yerton/Civil Beat

Hawaii Coffee Farmers: State Policy Is Putting Crops At Risk

Growers want Hawaii to adopt a strict federal policy designed to protect Hawaii coffee from invasive species.

How ‘Green Fees’ Might Offset The Hidden Costs Of Tourism In Hawaii Cory Lum/Civil Beat

How ‘Green Fees’ Might Offset The Hidden Costs Of Tourism In Hawaii

A growing number of tourism hot spots, ranging from Mallorca to Bhutan to New Zealand, are imposing new taxes and fees on visitors.