Civil Beat Staff

Kirstin Downey

Kirstin Downey, a local girl who went to Kailua High School and then Penn State University, has returned home to the islands. She covers the federal government and its myriad effects on the lives of the people of Hawaii.

Kirstin had an award-winning career on the mainland, climbing from small newspapers in Colorado and Florida to bigger ones in major cities. At the San Jose Mercury in Silicon Valley in the 1980s, Kirstin wrote about the dwindling supply of low-income housing in the region and how rampant real estate speculation was damaging the banking industry. Her work foreshadowed the savings and loan crash of the early 1990s, and she covered the nation’s response as a reporter at the Washington Post.

At the Washington Post, Kirstin won six regional reporting awards for her coverage of economic, political and financial issues. She was a finalist for the Livingston award for outstanding young journalist in America for her series of stories on how investors had abused government loan programs to profiteer and destroy inner-city neighborhoods in the District, contributing to the growing social woes there. She used land records and mortgage filings to document the patterns. Her coverage contributed to what became the largest single set of prosecutions in the history of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, leading to more than 50 convictions.

Kirstin was awarded a Nieman fellowship at Harvard University in 2000-2001 after writing many stories about sexual harassment in the workplace, a social problem that came to light in depositions and documents filed in dozens of class-action lawsuits around the country.

She covered the terrorist attacks in New York City in 2001, writing about the events of the day and the tragic impact on human lives and the U.S. economy, as well as the mysterious follow-on anthrax attacks.

From 2005 to 2007, Kirstin wrote dozens of stories chronicling the dangerous growth of toxic mortgages, repeatedly raising concerns to government agencies that should have been doing more to stop the looming crisis. She emphasized the human impact of the problems, including the foreclosures that devastated families. In 2007, she used data-driven reporting to write in-depth stories describing the pernicious effect of toxic loans targeted and marketed to minorities, immigrants and young families.

She shared in the Pulitzer Prize awarded to the Washington Post’s metro staff in 2008 for coverage of the campus massacre at Virginia Tech. Kirstin wrote pieces profiling the two heroic professors who died that day protecting their students.

After leaving the Post, Kirstin served as an investigator and writer for the Financial Crisis Inquiry Commission, (the Angelides Commission), which published a New York Times-bestselling book on the causes and implications of the economic meltdown of 2008. She wrote the section of the book that detailed the many specific warnings that were ignored by corporations and top government officials.

Kirstin loves history. She is a book author, published by Nan Talese at Doubleday/Random House. Her biography of Frances Perkins, “The Woman Behind the New Deal,” a portrait of the country’s most effective progressive, was named one of the top 10 biographies of the year by the American Library Association. Her book about the controversial Queen Isabella of Spain, “Isabella the Warrior Queen,” was named to BBC’s list of Ten Books to Read, November 2014 and was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times award for best biography of the year. The book has been translated into Spanish, Polish and Chinese.

Kirstin and her husband, Neil Averitt, live in Honolulu. Together they have five children. She is trying to learn to speak Hawaiian, and finding it very difficult.

Judge Puts Chill On Lawsuit Over Pesticides At Kaneohe Marine Base Housing Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Judge Puts Chill On Lawsuit Over Pesticides At Kaneohe Marine Base Housing

Hundreds of service members alleged they should have been warned about pesticide problem at the Marine Corps Base Hawaii in Kaneohe.

Federal Leaders Look To Improve Military Housing Conditions Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Federal Leaders Look To Improve Military Housing Conditions

The Department of Defense and congressional members of both parties are pushing for new regulations on the private companies that serve as landlords.

The Grim State Of Military Housing In Hawaii Kirstin Downey

The Grim State Of Military Housing In Hawaii

Hundreds of families have complained about poor conditions and mistreatment by private landlords operating base housing.

Kailua Residents Long For Past, Worry About Future Nathan Eagle/Civil Beat

Kailua Residents Long For Past, Worry About Future

The community is grappling with a number of issues as it grows from a small town to an overcrowded tourist destination.

Never-Ending Waikiki Sidewalk Project Hurts Businesses, Obstructs Tourists Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Never-Ending Waikiki Sidewalk Project Hurts Businesses, Obstructs Tourists

“It’s a disaster, there’s no question”: Work that began a year ago is still disrupting the south end of the bustling district.

Proposed Housing Development Gets A Rough Reception In Kaneohe Kirstin Downey/Civil Beat

Proposed Housing Development Gets A Rough Reception In Kaneohe

Honolulu City Council Chairman Ikaika Anderson, who represents the area, was harshly criticized for initially supporting the eight-home project. He now opposes it.

The Only Way To Save This Popular Oahu Park May Be To Close It At Night

The Only Way To Save This Popular Oahu Park May Be To Close It At Night

Oneula Beach Park in Ewa Beach, a popular spot for local fishermen, is the last park on the island that is still open all night.

Residents: Pieces Of History Could Have Been Lost To Future Ball Fields Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Residents: Pieces Of History Could Have Been Lost To Future Ball Fields

City and state officials may have allowed part of Sherwood Forest to be stripped bare without proper archaeological monitoring.

Makiki Loved Its ‘People’s Library’ — So Why Did It Close? Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Makiki Loved Its ‘People’s Library’ — So Why Did It Close?

The community library fell victim to miscommunication, unkept promises and a final act of desperation by the longtime volunteers.

Some Community Leaders In Kailua Want To Break Up With Honolulu Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Some Community Leaders In Kailua Want To Break Up With Honolulu

Neighborhood board members are angry about the city’s failure to control the spread of vacation rentals, tourism and monster homes.

Three Council Members Call For Halt To Waimanalo Ball Field Project Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Three Council Members Call For Halt To Waimanalo Ball Field Project

In the face of growing opposition, Mayor Kirk Caldwell said he remains committed to pushing ahead with the project.

Bills On Ige’s Desk Could Be ‘Game-Changer’ For Criminal Justice Reform Cory Lum/Civil Beat

Bills On Ige’s Desk Could Be ‘Game-Changer’ For Criminal Justice Reform

Laws that cleared the Legislature would open up jails and courts to more scrutiny and improve the bail system.